Now, That's a Man: Pre-Worshipped Maruti Suzuki SX4 ZDi (Rebuild & Ownership Review)


Thread Starter #31
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Oct 1, 2018
Messages
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Kollam
Transmission Overhaul
Almost everything has arrived now, so let's kickstart the rebuild[evil].
Conditon of gearbox!!
Compress_20220501_143445_5027.jpg

Compress_20220501_143446_6248.jpg
Compress_20220501_143447_7564.jpg

Disassembling
Compress_20220501_143449_9153.jpg
Remove the lock with a screwdriver and insert a piece to cloth between the gears.(avoid using screwdrivers)
Compress_20220501_143452_2414.jpg

Then use a proper socket and remove the nut
Compress_20220501_143453_3881.jpg

5th gear hub assembly
Compress_20220501_143455_5337.jpg
Compress_20220501_143456_6348.jpg
Compress_20220501_143457_7735.jpg
Compress_20220501_143459_9633.jpg
Compress_20220501_143500_0702.jpg

Removing gear shifter assembly
Compress_20220501_143501_1952.jpg
Compress_20220501_143503_3753.jpg
Compress_20220501_143505_5546.jpg

Gear shifter
Compress_20220501_143507_7324.jpg

Now remove all the bolts around the gearbox
Compress_20220501_143508_8955.jpg

Don't forget to remove this bolt (bolt holding the reverse gear)
IMG_20220510_140516.jpg

3 bolts are located inside bell hosuing. We need to remove that too.
IMG_20220510_140611.jpg

Now use a screw driver and pry a little to seperate the gearbox housing. (Do not use hammer to seperate)
Compress_20220501_143513_3487.jpg

Gearbox after seperating
Compress_20220501_143514_4949.jpg

Main shaft and counter shaft
Compress_20220501_143517_7556.jpg

Remove reverse light switch
Compress_20220501_143518_8357.jpg

Remove the speedometer sensor
Compress_20220501_143521_1618.jpg

1.67L kms of dust
Compress_20220501_143528_8776.jpg
Cleaning!!
It may look simple,but takes almost two whole days to complete,and gaves me a lot of body pain[sad]
Compress_20220501_143536_6799.jpg

After cleaning..
Compress_20220501_143525_5075.jpg

But i am not satisfied with the result, so decided to go for wire brushing!!
Compress_20220501_143538_8228.jpg

After wire brushing!![evil]
Compress_20220501_143754_4359.jpg
Compress_20220501_143802_2059.jpg

Changing the synchronizer
Many people may tell you that you need a hydraulic press to do this, but actually you don't need one.. You just need bearing pullers.
(Some mechanics use chisels and hammers to remove gears from shaftring on't do that, it may damage the gears.)
Compress_20220501_143850_0516.jpg
Compress_20220501_143853_3191.jpg
Compress_20220501_143854_4289.jpg
Compress_20220501_143900_0417.jpg

Synchronizer Ring set
Compress_20220501_143902_2412.jpg
Compress_20220501_143905_5193.jpg

Damaged ring
Compress_20220501_143904_4106.jpg

Damaged ring close-up (This 'step' formation is the reason behind the gear shifting issue)
Compress_20220501_143924_4254.jpg

Good ring
Compress_20220501_143925_5867.jpg
Compress_20220501_143907_7234.jpg

Remove the lock to remove the hub assembly
Compress_20220501_143911_1120.jpg
Compress_20220501_143913_3336.jpg
Compress_20220501_143916_6433.jpg

First gear synhronizer
Compress_20220501_143918_8463.jpg

Hub lock set
Compress_20220501_143922_2609.jpg

Compress_20220501_143927_7763.jpg

After complete disassembly
Compress_20220501_143929_9883.jpg

After cleaning with diesel, petrol and water
Compress_20220510_144217_7551.jpg

Install roller bearing
Compress_20220510_144217_7129.jpg

Adding lubrication (Fresh new gear oil)
Compress_20220510_144216_6201.jpg

Inserting first gear
Compress_20220510_144215_5401.jpg

Installing new synchronizer
Compress_20220510_144214_4764.jpg
Compress_20220510_144213_3898.jpg
Compress_20220510_144212_2325.jpg

Installing Hub
Compress_20220510_144211_1247.jpg
Compress_20220510_144209_9170.jpg

While installing the hub, make sure the locks are properly seated. If it didn't seat properly, the gears won't engage easily and you need to remove the whole gearbox and disassemble it completely to clear it.
Compress_20220510_144208_8286.jpg
Compress_20220510_144206_6506.jpg

Installing second gear synchronizer
Compress_20220510_144205_5538.jpg

Installing other things
Compress_20220510_144204_4487.jpg
Compress_20220510_144203_3754.jpg
Compress_20220510_144203_3031.jpg
Compress_20220510_144202_2068.jpg

Counter shaft assembling completed
Compress_20220510_144200_0874.jpg

Everything washed with diesel, petrol and water
Compress_20220510_144159_9399.jpg

Rebuilding
(Always do works like this in a clean dust free place)
Compress_20220501_144359_9287.jpg

Installing oil seals
Compress_20220501_144358_8520.jpg
Compress_20220501_144400_0873.jpg
Compress_20220501_144402_2413.jpg
Compress_20220501_144404_4267.jpg
Compress_20220501_144406_6019.jpg

Installing Crown wheel
Compress_20220501_144408_8147.jpg

Main shaft
Compress_20220501_144408_8810.jpg

Main and Counter
Compress_20220501_144411_1922.jpg

Installing these shafts is a tricky thing. You need to install both shafts with shift forks at the sametime
Compress_20220501_144413_3739.jpg

Installing reverse gear
Compress_20220501_144414_4399.jpg
Compress_20220501_144415_5633.jpg
Compress_20220501_144417_7155.jpg
Compress_20220501_144418_8675.jpg

Before installing the cover, make sure this screw hole is aligned with the marking in the gearbox housing
IMG_20220510_155542.jpg
Compress_20220501_144422_2153.jpg

Now add a light even coat of rtv on the mating surface.
Do not apply too much rtv like the garage guys.
(It only makes things worse)
Compress_20220501_144425_5200.jpg


Compress_20220501_144427_7216.jpg

Tightening the housing
Compress_20220501_144427_7960.jpg

Installing reverse gear bolt (Don't forget the copper washer)
Compress_20220501_144429_9521.jpg

Installing the lock and metal washer
Compress_20220501_144431_1083.jpg
?hash=0f3f1b959768306610602e24bbef0307.jpg

While installing the metal plate, make sure it seats properly like this
Compress_20220501_144434_4117.jpg
Compress_20220501_144435_5628.jpg

Installing 5th gear assembly
Compress_20220501_144437_7149.jpg

5th gear synchronizer
Compress_20220501_144438_8412.jpg

5th gear hub
Compress_20220501_144439_9688.jpg

Compress_20220501_144441_1492.jpg
while installing the hub, make sure these markings are aligning properly
Compress_20220501_144443_3265.jpg
Compress_20220501_144451_1208.jpg

Now install the nut and lock it with screwdriver and hammer
Compress_20220501_144453_3713.jpg
 

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mayankdixit

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Awesome job (if done as DIY in home with no help at all) !!

Don't mind if ask you, but what was the need to dismantle the gearbox completely? Looks fine from inside,except some oil and grime outside.
Reassembly to factory levels requires good torque wrench at all steps and Workshop repair manual to advise the correct torque for each and every bolt.
 
Last edited:
Thread Starter #33
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Oct 1, 2018
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Kollam
Installing gear shifter assembly
Compress_20220501_144448_8424.jpg

Installing reverse light switch
Compress_20220501_144449_9962.jpg

Compress_20220501_144458_8930.jpg
Compress_20220501_144459_9647.jpg

Installing release bearing
Compress_20220501_144501_1708.jpg
Compress_20220501_144504_4843.jpg
Compress_20220501_144506_6103.jpg

Job Completed! [cheers]
Compress_20220501_144523_3513.jpg

The next step is to rebuild the engine. But first, some preparation is required.Let's do it..
Polishing the crankshaft
This was the conditon of the crankshaft. It may look horrible, but actually its just material transfer from the bearing and the crank pins are still smooth. (Run your fingernail across the crank pins to test this, if you can feel any deep scratches that means the crank is damaged and needs repalcement or polishing.Here i can't feel anything and it feels smooth.)
To double check, i gave the crank to a machine shop to check the crank and they told me everything was in good condtiton, (I can still use the STD size bearings),but need a little bit of polishing to remove the material transfer from the bearing.
I really want to try the DIY method of crank polishing since i watched that video on youtube.So this will be the perfect opportunity to test that method.:lol!:
Compress_20220510_200855_5554.jpg

Polishing Crankshaft using 1000/1500 and 2000 Grit sandpaper
Compress_20220501_143953_3090.jpg

Compress_20220501_143957_7468.jpg

Result..
Compress_20220501_144006_6733.jpg

Smooth and Shiny!!
Compress_20220501_144009_9297.jpg

Changing Diesel Filter
Compress_20220501_143711_1284.jpg

Yup, that was me working inside the engine bay.:lol!:
Compress_20220510_205624_4389.jpg

To remove the filter housing, you need a special tool. I searched for this tool everywhere, including Shakti Tools Trivandrum. (famous for automotive special tools) At Shakthi, the tool is available but costs around Rs 2000 (maybe due to its quality). But I don't think that's a fair deal. So I searched on Amazon and found the tool from a brand called GIZMO. It costs only 400 or something. I purchased the tool from Amazon. The tool is very good for that price range, and the quality is more than enough for occasional users like me.
(Not that good for rough uses like garages)
Compress_20220501_144853_3040.jpg

Conditon of filter [frustration] (Remember, this was a completely showroom serviced vehicle.)
Compress_20220501_144833_3372.jpg

Déjà vu
Compress_20220501_144837_7797.jpg

Compress_20220501_144839_9029.jpg
 

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Thread Starter #34
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Awesome job (if done as DIY in home with no help at all) !!
Thank you![:D] Yes, I did everything by myself at home, and no one is helping me except for the engine removal and installation.
Don't mind if ask you, but what was the need to dismantle the gearbox completely? Looks fine from inside,except some oil and grime outside.
Remember, at the beginning of this post I mentioned that the second gear was not engaging properly.
IMG_20220510_220546.jpg

It is a common problem with this gearbox. (used in the Swift, SX4, Ertiga, and many other Maruti diesel vehicles).
The reason behind this issue was a damaged synchronizer ring.
IMG_20220510_221052.jpg

To resolve this issue, we need to disassemble the gearbox and the countergear shaft completely and replace the damaged synchronizer with a new one.
Reassembly to factory levels requires good torque wrench at all steps and Workshop repair manual to advise the correct torque for each and every bolt.
Yes, I know that but the service manual for this car is not available anywhere. So my only option is to use something good enough to hold the housing tightly (don't remember the exact torque figure I used) without stripping the threads, and adding a little bit of threadlocker to the threads will do the work just fine. (Yes, i followed the criss cross pattern and torquing every bolt equally)
No need to worry about that..[:)]
 

deville_56

Honoured Member
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Trivandrum
Thank you![:D] Yes, I did everything by myself at home, and no one is helping me except for the engine removal and installation.
Eyes glued on this thread. Wished you could've done more elaborative DIYs on Beat before selling it. Just curious, what do you do for a living?

To remove the filter housing, you need a special tool. I searched for this tool everywhere, including Shakti Tools Trivandrum. (famous for automotive special tools) At Shakthi, the tool is available but costs around Rs 2000 (maybe due to its quality). But I don't think that's a fair deal. So I searched on Amazon and found the tool from a brand called GIZMO. It costs only 400 or something. I purchased the tool from Amazon. The tool is very good for that price range, and the quality is more than enough for occasional users like me.
(Not that good for rough uses like garages)
Shakti stocks only branded and quality stuff, obviously not affordable for DIYers like us. There is another shop somewhat diagonally opposite Shakthi called Karthik that got cheaper brands with decent quality. Bought my first ratchet and sockets from them.
 
Thread Starter #36
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Eyes glued on this thread. Wished you could've done more elaborative DIYs on Beat before selling it. Just curious, what do you do for a living?
[:D]
I really wanted to complete that thread with more diy's and information, but things got out of hand!:sorry:
But this rebuild may be useful for beat diesel owners too.
Because the 3 cylinder smartech engine has almost the same design and parts as the 4 cylinder varient.Even the pistons of beat diesel and swift diesel are the same.
(Major differences are in the balancer shaft, PCV filter, design of the EGR assembly, throttle etc.)

I am an IT fresher studying cloud computing now (Microsoft Azure).[:D]
Shakti stocks only branded and quality stuff, obviously not affordable for DIYers like us. There is another shop somewhat diagonally opposite Shakthi called Karthik that got cheaper brands with decent quality. Bought my first ratchet and sockets from them.
Thank you for this valuable information! I really did not know about Karthik.
I will definitely visit the shop next time.[cheers]
 
Thread Starter #37
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The Rebuild![evil]
Before starting the rebuild, we need to make sure that everything is cleaned thoroughly.

Cleaning Sensors (with throttle body cleaner)
Oxygen Sensor after cleaning
Compress_20220501_143313_3013.jpg

MAP Sensor
Compress_20220501_143316_6383.jpg
Compress_20220501_143318_8416.jpg

Crankshaft position sensor
Compress_20220501_143324_4324.jpg

Camshaft position sensor
Compress_20220501_143326_6355.jpg

Oil pressure switch
Compress_20220501_143320_0765.jpg

After cleaning everything
Compress_20220501_143328_8601.jpg

Cleaning catalytic converter
Compress_20220512_154739_9524.jpg
Compress_20220512_154738_8136.jpg

For cleaning, I am using plain water with pressure (I don't want to use diesel or petrol because I don't know if it damage the catalyst or not). My catalytic converter is in good condition and not clogged.
But in some cars, it may be clogged severely, and that clog creates backpressure. This backpressure can damage the turbocharger pretty quickly. So don't forget to clean the catalytic convertors.
Compress_20220512_154732_2275.jpg
Compress_20220512_154734_4436.jpg
Compress_20220512_154736_6148.jpg

Cleaning EGR Valve Assembly
Compress_20220501_143255_5289.jpg

Solenoid
Compress_20220501_143257_7993.jpg
Compress_20220501_143259_9907.jpg
Compress_20220501_143302_2573.jpg

Conditon of EGR valve
Compress_20220501_143304_4587.jpg
Compress_20220501_143306_6617.jpg
Conditon of rubber hoses (best example of why we must replace every rubber hose during overhaul).
Compress_20220501_144607_7356.jpg
Compress_20220501_143339_9212.jpg

Nozzle after cleaning
Compress_20220501_144608_8630.jpg

Before
Compress_20220426_112439_9700.jpg

After cleaning and replacing rubber hoses
Compress_20220501_144612_2500.jpg

After washing everything thoroughly (second round)
Compress_20220501_144129_9349.jpg

Step 1: Installing Oil squirters aka Piston cooling jets
Compress_20220501_144131_1520.jpg
Compress_20220501_144132_2583.jpg

All 4 squirters installed
Compress_20220501_144135_5935.jpg

Step 2: Install Main Bearings
Notice the STD marking, means it is standard size. This bearing comes with thrust washers. (Some cars we need to install these thrust washers seperately).
Thrust washers are used to decrease the side to side play of the crankshaft
Compress_20220501_144138_8129.jpg
Compress_20220501_144140_0505.jpg
Compress_20220501_144143_3659.jpg
Compress_20220501_144146_6024.jpg

Now, install the bearings in the crankcase cover
Compress_20220501_144151_1021.jpg

Compress_20220501_144148_8655.jpg
Compress_20220501_144153_3989.jpg

Step 3: Lube the bearings properly and install the crankshaft.
(For lubing, i highly recommend to use Assembly Lube. It gives you enough protection from wear and tear during initial start). Here i am using fresh engine oil because assembly lube was not easily available offline.

Example for assembly lube
images - 2022-05-12T173252.354.jpeg

Before lubing, make sure every bearings are super clean and free from dirt or dust.
Compress_20220501_144156_6865.jpg

Now add a little bit of oil in the Main journals and try to ratate the crank. The crank must spin freely.
Compress_20220501_144158_8729.jpg

Step 4: Now apply rtv in the crank case cover's mating surface. The coating must be light and even. (Always use genuine high quality rtv)
DO NOT USE TOO MUCH RTV.
Compress_20220501_144200_0459.jpg

Then gently close the crankcase cover and install the bolts
Compress_20220501_144202_2463.jpg

Step 5: Torque the bolts properly.
This is a very crucial step and do not skip this step.
We need to torque every crank bolt exactly the same. If we skip the step, the crank may not spin smoothly or cause some other problems in future.
But the problem here is i don't have a Service manual for SX4. But while searching online i got some information..
IMG_20220512_175512.jpg
IMG_20220512_175527.jpg

Link

Now check the crank to see if it spins smoothly. If you feel like the crank is not spinning freely or jammed, remove the bolts and check everything once again.
Do not move to the next step until you resolve the issue.
Here, my crank was spinning smoothly! [clap]
Compress_20220501_144206_6582.jpg

Neat even sealing!
Compress_20220501_144208_8433.jpg

Step 6: Installing the Pistons
Before installing the pistons, let me show you the things to keep in mind about connecting rods while assembling.
Compress_20220512_182839_9720.jpg

In this engine, the connecting rods have numbers labelled on the cap and rod.
This is to ensure that we are using the correct cap for the correct connecting rod.
Always make sure the numbers on the rod and cap match and at the same time, make sure that the numbers or alphabets labelled on the side of the connecting rods are facing towards the timing side.
Compress_20220512_182839_9180.jpg

If you use another rod's cap, the pattern of the crack in the rod and cap may not match properly and may create problems.
Compress_20220512_182838_8085.jpg

Piston set (Goetze)
IMG_20220512_184552.jpg

Rings set
Compress_20220501_144210_0399.jpg
Oil ring with expander
Compress_20220501_144214_4562.jpg
Compress_20220501_144217_7116.jpg

At first, we need to install the expander ring
Compress_20220501_144219_9720.jpg
Then install the oil ring
Compress_20220501_144220_0751.jpg

Then install the two compression rings according to order.
Compress_20220501_144223_3651.jpg

(Installing the piston ring by hand is a tricky process. Even small mistakes may break the rings. So If you don't have enough experience and confidence, please don't try this.
Use proper piston ring expander tool..

Now install the new Piston pin aka Gudgeon pin, circlip lock and big end bearings aka connecting rod bearings)
Compress_20220501_144228_8256.jpg

Compress_20220501_144230_0481.jpg

Now do the same for all the remaining pistons.
Compress_20220501_144231_1936.jpg

After completing the assembling of all 4 pistons, I gave it a round of petrol wash to make sure the pistons are 100% clean and also to satisfy my ocd.:lol!:
Compress_20220501_144238_8318.jpg

Now, lets install the pistons using ring compressor. Before installing the pistons make sure the piston and cylinder walls are properly lubricated with fresh engine oil and the ring gaps are aligned according to spec.
Compress_20220501_144249_9919.jpg
IMG_20220512_193821.jpg

This was the method I used.(Some people use different method).
The main goal of this setting is to ensure that the gaps of every ring are not aligned in the same order.
But the truth is that every rings rotates freely when the engine is in working condition.
(I don't know why manufacturers recommend it even if the rings rotate freely while working.)
IMG_20220512_193621.jpg

Compress_20220501_144252_2320.jpg

While installing pistons, make sure that the arrow markings are pointing towards the timing side. (Like in this pic)
Compress_20220501_144325_5598.jpg

After installing the pistons, and torquing all the caps, check for side-to-side play in connecting rod. Every connecting rod must have a little side-to-side play.
(If it didn't have that free play, the engine could seize quickly or the bearings could be damaged easily.)
Compress_20220501_144254_4079.jpg

Step 7: Installing Crankshaft Rear Main Seal.
Easiest way to install this seal is to install it while installing the crank case cover.
(This is the most expensive oil seal in this engine (Costs 900Rs), so install it very carefully.)
Compress_20220501_144336_6022.jpg

Step 8: Install the Flywheel
Before installing the flywheel remove the oil coating on the flywheel using petrol or something like that
Compress_20220501_144336_6696.jpg

Compress_20220501_144338_8957.jpg

To torque the bolts of the flywheel, you have to lock the crank first, a small hole is provided in the flywheel to lock the crank.
Use an allen key or something like that to lock the crank.
Compress_20220501_144342_2335.jpg
Compress_20220501_144343_3345.jpg

Step 9: Installing Clutch
Compress_20220501_144344_4866.jpg

Compress_20220501_144345_5525.jpg

Before installing the pressure plate, remove the oil coating from the surface.
Compress_20220501_144346_6992.jpg

Compress_20220501_144351_1948.jpg

Before tightening the clutch cover bolts, we have to align the clutch properly. To do that, we need a clutch alignment tool. (We can't install the gearbox until the clutch is aligned properly.)
But I don't have a clutch alignment tool, so I used the whole gearbox to align the clutch properly!:stupid:

Step 10: Install Oil Pan Baffle Plate
Compress_20220501_144357_7254.jpg

Step 11: Install Gearbox and Oil Pan(Temporary)
To do further jobs, we have to install the gearbox and oil pan
Compress_20220501_144528_8618.jpg
Engine after straightening up
Compress_20220501_144534_4775.jpg

See all the pistons lined up in the same order? This is timing of crankshaft in this engine(not at TDC). We can lock the crank through a small hole provided under the gearbox.
Compress_20220501_144540_0591.jpg

Cylinder Head with new valves, seal, guide and seat.
Compress_20220501_144541_1290.jpg

Compress_20220501_144124_4934.jpg

Smooth and flat surface!
Compress_20220501_144122_2586.jpg

Step 12: Installing Head Gasket and Cylinder Head
Compress_20220501_144542_2732.jpg
Compress_20220501_144543_3389.jpg

Compress_20220501_144552_2816.jpg

Now, torque the cylinder head bolt in the following order.
astra-j-6000.jpg

Torque spec
IMG_20220512_221241.jpg

After torquing cylinder head
Compress_20220501_144555_5866.jpg

Step 13: Installing Manifolds and other things
Compress_20220501_144601_1190.jpg

Compress_20220501_144602_2431.jpg

Used threadlocker in the threads and grease in the body of the bolts (These bolts are notorious for rusting).
Compress_20220501_144605_5818.jpg

Exhaust manifold
Compress_20220501_144617_7558.jpg
Compress_20220501_144621_1592.jpg

MAP Sensor installed
Compress_20220501_144628_8943.jpg

EGR Valve
Compress_20220501_144632_2470.jpg

Confirming the position of the pistons using my Estilo's dipstick!
Compress_20220501_144636_6995.jpg

Bleeding Air from HLA
Process
Compress_20220501_144645_5850.jpg

HLA's Installed
Compress_20220501_144647_7669.jpg

Lubricating Rocker Arms
Compress_20220501_144649_9286.jpg

Installing Rocker Arms
Compress_20220501_144651_1093.jpg
Compress_20220501_144652_2895.jpg

New Rocker Arms and HLA's Installed!
Compress_20220501_144654_4183.jpg
 
Last edited:
Thread Starter #38
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
65
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156
Location
Kollam
Step 14: Installing Valve Cover

Compress_20220501_144657_7269.jpg

Before installing valve cover, make sure the camshaft and crankshaft is locked completly.
Position to lock camshaft
Compress_20220501_144658_8333.jpg

Crankshaft locking positon
Compress_20220501_144707_7574.jpg

Camshaft locking tool
Compress_20220501_144903_3014.jpg

After locking cam and crank, install the valve cover and torque the bolts.
(Do not remove any of the timing lock before torquing the crank bolt)
Step 15: Install the new timing kit
Compress_20220501_144703_3701.jpg

Compress_20220501_144705_5743.jpg

Installing tensioner and timing chain oil jet
(Remove this lock just before installing the timing cover)
Compress_20220501_144711_1228.jpg

Installing timing cover gasket
(Before installing the gasket, make sure to super clean the surface where gasket seats)
Compress_20220501_144729_9928.jpg

Step 16: Install new Oil pump+ Timing cover
Compress_20220501_144718_8852.jpg

Installing the crankshaft pulley and torque the bolt.
(Now, you can remove the timing locks)
Compress_20220501_144722_2212.jpg

Torque Spec
How-to-replace-timing-chain-on-Vauxhall-Opel-Agila-A-1.3-CDTI.png

Step 17: Install Oil Pan
Apply a little thick coating of rtv in the oil pan's mating surface.
(Don't make it too thick)
Compress_20220501_144738_8354.jpg

Compress_20220501_144739_9168.jpg

Step 18: Install other accessories (compressor, alternator, glowplugs etc)

Installing starter
Compress_20220501_144741_1589.jpg

Installing dipstick and rubber seal
Compress_20220501_144759_9659.jpg

Compress_20220501_144802_2544.jpg

Compress_20220501_144803_3917.jpg

Installing Glowplugs
Compress_20220501_144745_5970.jpg
Compress_20220501_144749_9076.jpg

Installing Oil Seperator
Compress_20220501_144808_8541.jpg

Compress_20220501_144809_9487.jpg

OEM for rubber hoses is Lakhani not Lakshmi.:stupid:

Installing CMP
Compress_20220501_144750_0053.jpg

Installing Oil Pressure Switch
Compress_20220501_144751_1695.jpg

Compress_20220501_144753_3248.jpg

Installing Thermostat
Compress_20220501_144815_5412.jpg
Compress_20220501_144817_7164.jpg
Installing High Pressure Pump and Vaccum Pump
Compress_20220501_144817_7836.jpg
Compress_20220501_144819_9677.jpg
Compress_20220501_144820_0410.jpg

Installing Injectors and Common rail.
Injectors after cleaning the body.
(Ofcourse, these injectors needs servicing, but i skipped that for now. Defnitly do that after completing the breake-in period)
Compress_20220501_144825_5821.jpg

Installing new copper washers
Compress_20220501_144829_9674.jpg

Compress_20220501_144831_1158.jpg

Install these injectors in the correct order.
(we have to note down which injector is going to which cylinder while disassembling)
Compress_20220501_144832_2670.jpg

Compress_20220501_144841_1591.jpg

After installing injectors and its lines
Compress_20220501_144844_4474.jpg


Installing exhaust manifold cover
Compress_20220501_144846_6284.jpg

Compress_20220501_144847_7825.jpg

Installing Intermediate shaft, vaccum tank etc
Compress_20220501_144858_8206.jpg

Installing new water pump
Compress_20220501_144908_8965.jpg

Compress_20220501_144910_0786.jpg

I really loves the side view of this engine!
Compress_20220501_144912_2346.jpg
Compress_20220501_144915_5840.jpg

Installing AC Compressor
Compress_20220501_144921_1347.jpg
Compress_20220501_144926_6604.jpg

Dish washing scrubber can do wonders in these kind of dirt!!
Compress_20220501_144920_0312.jpg

Installing new serpentine belt (Continental)
Compress_20220501_144928_8432.jpg

Installing Oil Cooler
(Before installing oil cooler, make sure the mating surface was clean and smooth and Do not use RTV in rubber gasket.)
Compress_20220501_144934_4694.jpg

Compress_20220501_144938_8544.jpg

Use a very thin coat of shellac compound in every metal gasket to prevent the risk of leak.
images - 2022-05-13T130916.163.jpeg
Compress_20220501_144940_0683.jpg

After installing turbo, catalytic converter, pipe lines, wiring harness and every other things.[clap]
Compress_20220501_144952_2768.jpg

It looks like a brand new engine!!
Compress_20220501_145001_1923.jpg

For a reference, here is the old pic..
Compress_20220513_132946_6742.jpg

I don't know how to express my feelings right now.
This build gaves me a lot of experience, knowledge and tonnes of pure satisfaction..[evil]
 

bhvm

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Wow wow wow! I am totally hooked to this thread.
Hats off man! totally next level DIY.
You only need a little bit of brake fluid near the injector, and that little amount of brake fluid won't spill or enter any other area.
If you still don't like using brake fluid, you can use Coca-Cola as an alternative.[:D]
WD-40, Zorrik 88 etc won't work well if the injector is seized too much.. Because it may evaporate quickly when the engine warms up..
Another option is to remove them hot. They come out so easily if you can run the engine for just 2 mins.

Its very surprising to see that the radiator has 2 fans and both are totally different.
They are of different sizes different shapes and different blade numbers,5 and 7 too !! Is it OEM ??
This is a common tactic.
My Safari 2 Radiator fans (3rd condensor fan)
And both Radiator fans are different speed. And are used as required.
There are separate relays for High speed & low speed fans.
 
Thread Starter #40
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Wow wow wow! I am totally hooked to this thread.
Hats off man! totally next level DIY.

Another option is to remove them hot. They come out so easily if you can run the engine for just 2 mins.
Thank you brother..
Really happy to know that everyone is enjoying this thread![clap]

Yes, in the most majority of cases, that technique may also work...[cheers]
 
Thread Starter #41
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Conditon of the car after 2 months of idle [frustration]
(Pic taken just before installing the engine)
Compress_20220516_215432_2523.jpg

Front lower cross member after cleaning and painted.
Compress_20220516_204554_4077.jpg

Radiator after flushing
Compress_20220516_204553_3216.jpg

Fans installed
Compress_20220516_204552_2415.jpg

While checking every other parts, found a crack in the hose of turbo's control valve.
Compress_20220516_204557_7643.jpg

Compress_20220516_204556_6604.jpg
Compress_20220516_204555_5757.jpg

Replaced those with new one.

Radiator Installed
Compress_20220516_204543_3678.jpg

Replacing every radiator hoses
Compress_20220516_204542_2699.jpg

Compress_20220516_204547_7040.jpg
Compress_20220516_204541_1249.jpg
Compress_20220516_204544_4887.jpg

Battery box after painted
Compress_20220516_204538_8657.jpg

Bleeding Clutch
Compress_20220516_204533_3766.jpg

Compress_20220516_204532_2932.jpg

Replacing Brake Pads
Compress_20220516_204606_6353.jpg

One side caliper pin was stuck.
Compress_20220516_204602_2194.jpg

After cleaning
Compress_20220516_204600_0985.jpg

Fresh thick pads!!
Compress_20220516_204559_9978.jpg

Condensor Installed!
(Yes, i know condensor was not in great conditon. Don't worry i will replace it soon...)
Compress_20220516_204534_4566.jpg

Installing Upper cross member
Compress_20220516_204519_9954.jpg

Installing Fuel tank
OEM for Low pressure pump was Continental
Compress_20220516_204528_8477.jpg

Compress_20220516_204527_7433.jpg

Selfie while resting! :lol!:
(I have a little bit of claustrophobia, and working under a car like this was a scary thing for me. but still i managed to complete the job.)
Compress_20220516_213527_7242.jpg

Filling Engine Oil
Compress_20220516_204516_6075.jpg

Filling Transmission oil
Compress_20220516_220911_1661.jpg


I wasn't able to take some pics. Here are the list of things done...
  • Connecting AC Lines
  • Connecting wiring harness
  • Installing New horns
Compress_20220516_220912_2084.jpg

  • Installing headlight
  • Replacing foglamps- Lumax(OEM) (old one was damaged)
  • Installing Airfilter
  • Installing bumber
  • Filling fresh diesel
  • Filling and bleeding radiator(with water)
All the work is completed..
Everything was working fine, none of the warning lamps were glowing! [clap]
Compress_20220516_222406_6855.jpg

Now the next step is to bleed the air from injectors and start the engine.
After completing the air bleeding, the engine starts right away without any hesitation.
NVH levels are very very low. It feels ALMOST like a brand new engine. But still i can hear a very light knocking sound (That's why i used the word almost).
That knocking was from the injectors, and while checking the rpm, it was still fluctuating (a classic indication of weak injectors).
This issue will clear up completely after servicing the injectors. So there's no need to be concerned. I am pretty damn sure that the engine will sound and perform EXACTLY like a brand new one after servicing the injectors!!

After Washing
Compress_20220516_231846_6890.jpg

Pic during testdrives
Compress_20220516_231847_7176.jpg
 
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bhvm

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That knocking was from the injectors, and while checking the rpm, it was still fluctuating (a classic indication of weak injectors).
This issue will clear up completely after servicing the injectors. So there's no need to be concerned.
If RPM fluctuation is very Minor, Try Abro DI 502 injector cleaner. Other option is STP.
I add it once in a while and all RPM Fluctuation gone. My Elephant (Safari) Seems to like it.
Since you had Injectors open, you can soak the tips directly in Injector cleaner liquid or try running the fluid through them (Instead of diesel).
and add the rest in Fuel tank.
 
Thread Starter #44
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Salute and huge huge respect to you @Auto_Psycho bro!

My ride is running with a synchronizer ring issue, which I am planning to do along with clutch change(Still clutch life is left). :
My Glistening Grey Maruti Suzuki Swift Reborn ZXi (2015) AKA Grey Beast
Thanks bro [:D]

Before disassembling the gearbox check the gear shift shaft assembly for any damage and please don't try to forcefully shift the gears. It only makes things worse (Instead, try double-clutching).
What's your recommendation, give it to my usual service centre with my supervision, or a FNG?
It can be given to your FNG or a service centre. It depends on who you have the most faith in. Whether it's FNG or a service centre, we only need to get the job done right.
In some places, service centres were good, but in some places, local garages were good. It all depends on who we trust the most.
So give it anywhere you can trust the most.
(No matter which one you choose, get it done with your supervision).
 
Thread Starter #45
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If RPM fluctuation is very Minor, Try Abro DI 502 injector cleaner. Other option is STP.
I add it once in a while and all RPM Fluctuation gone. My Elephant (Safari) Seems to like it.
Since you had Injectors open, you can soak the tips directly in Injector cleaner liquid or try running the fluid through them (Instead of diesel).
and add the rest in Fuel tank.
Yes the fluctuations was minor, but that was not the only problem. There was a little bit of power drop after mid rpm (probably due to high return flow).

My doubts with using injector cleaner is how to get the IMA code after cleaning?[roll]
 

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