Toyota Innova Crysta Review & Pictures: Crystalline Innovation


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Toyota Innova Crysta Review.png


Toyota Innova Crysta Review Synopsis:

  • Toyota Innova Crysta price tag starts from Rs.13.98 Lakh and Rs.14.21 Lakh for Petrol and Diesel respectively (Ex.showroom, Delhi).

  • The MUV launched in India on 4th May 2016. It’s available with a choice of three engine options: 2.4L Diesel, 2.8L Diesel & 2.7L Petrol.

  • 2.4 liter Diesel engine has a peak power output of 148 BHP, and a peak torque output of 343 Nm, with ARAI certified FE numbers ticking at 15.10 kmpl.

  • 2.8 liter Diesel engine has a peak power output of 172 BHP, and a peak torque output of 360 Nm, with ARAI certified FE numbers ticking at 14.29 kmpl.

  • 2.7 liter Petrol engine has a peak power output of 166 BHP, and a peak torque output of 245 Nm, with ARAI certified FE numbers ticking at 9.89 - 10.83 kmpl.

  • Apart from a significantly enhanced styling; space, comfort, performance, and ‘Toyota’ brand name are the major USPs’ which the Innova still carries with it.

Jump To:


  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525485']Toyota Innova Crysta: Introduction[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525486']Toyota Innova Crysta: Exteriors Design[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525487']Toyota Innova Crysta: Interiors Design[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525488']Toyota Innova Crysta: Diesel Engine Performance[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525489']Toyota Innova Crysta: Petrol Engine Performance[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525490']Toyota Innova Crysta: Safety, Braking, Ride & Handling[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525600']Toyota Innova Crysta: You'll Love, You'll Loathe & Star Ratings[/iurl]

  • [iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post526005']Toyota Innova Crysta: Price, Specifications, Comparison & Brochure[/iurl]
Note: Head on to this link for official review of Toyota Innova Touring Sport: Toyota Innova Touring Sport Review & Pictures: Sporty Innovation.
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Introduction


If I have to make a list of cars that revolutionized the Indian car market, the name Toyota Qualis will be on the top. It was the model which Toyota chose to kick-start their innings in India beginning this century. And it went on to become a success story but most importantly, what a strong foundation it laid for its successor: The Innova. Introduced in 2005, the Innova too replicated the same kind of success. Since Qualis had already done the job of proving Toyota’s quality and reliability to Indian customers, therefore, an all-new model was unquestionably a welcome move. The Innova came as a champion and retired like one. Who would have expected that Toyota will pull out the plug, when this product was still on the top of its game? The Innova was a cash cow in spite of being an 11-Year old model; it was selling well, it was a segment benchmark and still keeping cash registers ringing like no other. That’s how Innova kept changing its face, time and again. But the heart remained the same. But finally, the day came when it was time to say “goodbye champ”.

Toyota-Innova.jpg

It made a good business sense for Japs to keep running the previous gen along with their new offering, for catering the commercial segment. But, well, that’s the Toyota way – and we trust it. Even when none of competitors was even close to the Innova, Toyota decided to push the envelope further; simply out of the reach of its rivals with the launch of an extensive makeover named Innova Crysta. It’s a perfect upgrade for existing Innova owners and new buyers alike. In fact, this revision has come with such flamboyance that it dwarfed its own senior SUV sibling. We spent a bit over thousand kilometers under varying driving conditions with all-new Crysta. Did it impress us? Well, the answer lies in the last line of final paragraph, while the complete solution to the problem follows. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Exteriors Design


First thing that you’ll notice about the Innova Crysta is road-presence; unlike its predecessor which had a sure shot no-nonsense minivan silhouette. It’s taller, longer and wider than the model it replaces and this time bonnet is designed more like a crossover than a van. Look from any angle, Crysta appears more substantial than the car it replaces. Thanks to bold dual slit grille, front design looks even more imposing. Front is dominated by the huge bearded grille (It is well differentiated on lighter shades though) which basically seems to have its roots of inspiration lying with Audi. Don’t look around for the gun yet, let me explain. It’s with the Audi cars that we saw the front grille and lower air dam combined to look like a single unit, Toyota has done the similar thing; only by replacing the vertical slats with the horizontal ones. Basically upper part of the grille consists of two chrome slats, under which is a thick piano black plastic slat that separates upper grille and the lower air dam. The lower section is again big and the lower air dam isn’t actually placed that low. The registration plate takes that place instead.

The two thick chrome slats seamlessly pass into headlamps and join at the edge, a neat design element and certainly a place where proper alignment of panels is important. The headlamps are now bigger, better, and definitely richer. They’re equipped with LED projector for low beam and halogen for high beam, along with parking lights again being white illuminated LEDs placed at the inner section. I like simpler and meaner looking designs, definitely not up to my taste but it has managed to appeal the masses. The turn indicators have now moved to an unconventional position on the bumpers, sharing space with fog lamps. Although they are big and functional (they will be visible to on-coming traffic even if the driver doesn’t dip his high-beams) but they may get conked off or misaligned with even minor hits which can make the bumper flex. This means you need to keep even more distance with notorious auto-wallas.

Side profile is where the Innova Crysta simply gets caught as a ‘van’, long overhangs, large cab and a short bonnet, pakka van? Although it has grown in size, the new alloy wheels fill the wheel arches quite well and look masculine too. But, it is a van and still looks like one. In fact, if you take out the D-Pillar from equation, then any trained eye will easily tell you that it’s basically a revamped old Innova, especially going by the area around the B-Pillar. In fact, the front half of the side profile resembles the older car a lot, save for headlamps that now stretch a bit towards A-Pillar. The rear quarter is where the difference is much more visible. The new D-Pillar design looks a bit stylish (at the cost of glass area though), there is a shark fin antenna, and yes, the Crysta has creases too.


In times when manufacturers have ran out of body styles for side profile; the creases have become a new method of differentiating the models. Similar is the suite followed by the Toyota. Basically, if you forget the D-pillar and that well shaped spoiler, then there are a lot of similarities between the side profile of the outgoing car and this new generation. Here come the creases into picture. Make no mistake, it’s still an Innova and its side is still more of a plain design. So the entire side profile is dominated by an upper crease and a lower one. The upper crease adds to the actual design element, it’s sharp and distinguishing one. Starting right from front grille, this prominent crease passes all the way through window line and ends up at the tail lamps, which extrude a bit out of the body (translating that short-of-space-tight-overtakes will make you pay or a tail light too, not just rear bumper and side body scratches).

Another crease is on the lower section of doors, this one starts on front door and fades a bit at rear, where it meets the ‘Mercedes Pontoon’ style strong crease (was present in previous Innova too) and end up at the lower section of tail lamps. Front wheel arches flare out a bit and rear ones are too, we indeed like this much flaring in the people movers, more flaring indeed look out of place in them. Additionally, Indians have a habit of considering all seven seaters as SUVs, well, please don’t even think about it. The long front and rear overhangs won’t help a lot. I had the nose bruise against the tarmac after I had to put the front wheels inside a deep pit at slow speeds to avoid a truck.

The rear is big and bulky, no two ways about it. That’s good going by practicality point of view, as it gives more boot space and better space to third row occupants. Although the spoiler tries to add a bit of drama, but it still looks bland, Toyota has tried to add some drama to the back by using the new design horizontal tail lamp layout along with vertically mounted turn indicators (seriously, for once, I thought that some Chinese designer made it). Thankfully Toyota decided not to use a thick chrome strip on rear number plate garnish; it would have taken the awkwardness to a new level.

The tailgate is big, but wait, it is much functional too. I’m afraid that negligibly extruded small rear bumper will offer any protection from rear impact though (Hexa has a proper thick and strong rear bumper), but that said, loading and unloading is quite easy in the Crysta. Additionally, we love the soft boot closing and release, with the whine of the motor, one can easily feel tailgate being released of shutting. Anyways, if its form vs function; it scores really well on the second aspect. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Interiors Design


Keyfob in pocket, request button pressed, you get to take notice of a mild click sound. Well, the vehicle is unlocked. Open the door and a surprise awaits you. If we weren’t too impressed by the exteriors, the interior did more than enough to compensate every single shortcoming the exterior had. First of all, you walk into the Innova Crysta, there is nothing like a climb in case of this car. The front doors are big and wide, but have a light build and shut with a tinny sound. On the inside, first impressions are brilliant. The well-supportive seats, awesome looking steering wheel and an overall design that will eclipse even D-segment sedans too in terms of posh feel. This is where the Innova Crysta feels like it’s more than just a new generation, but even a segment above too, from the model it replaces.

For anyone with a medium frame and 5’10” height like me, the driver’s seat is supremely comfortable, the cushioning is just right and bolstering is good enough that you never sit on the seat; you actually sit ‘in’ it. What has actually appeased us is that Toyota has decided to move away from the beige, therefore, the interiors including the seats mainly comprises of shades of brown, grey and black. So are the seats, finished in light brown and black, these 8 way electrically adjustable seats are supremely comfortable and what I particularly liked is the under thigh support, I personally end up craving for under thigh support in many cars, not an issue with Innova Crysta. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is by far the most comfortable driver’s seat on this side of 25 lakh, at least for me. The pedals are well placed, gear lever is ergonomically placed, armrest, although a bit hard on cushioning, still is placed at just the right position. Ergonomics is something Toyota never goes wrong with and Crysta is just another example of same. There are many thoughtful touches to enhance driver’s comfort, which we’ll discuss in pictorial review.

The well chiseled dashboard is indeed the most attractive part of the entire package. Although there is no fort touch plastic, the black plastic is hard and a bit shiny too but still it exudes quality. One would hardly find anything to complaint. People are frequently found complaining that the black interior is dark and claustrophobic; well, not with the Innova Crysta. The huge glass area makes sure that there is a lot of light inside, additionally the upper section along with pillars and entire roof liner are shaded in light grey, hence one would have very less to complaint, at least until one is obsessed with the beige. That said, this is a really top heavy dashboard and although the visibility all round is just fantastic, the shorter drivers may complaint about the frontal visibility. Else overall, the dashboard feels like a direct lift from some good luxury cars and offers nothing to complaint.


Open the rear door and you are again greeted by a similar set of captain seats (Note: Z trims don’t get the option of middle row bench). The seats are exactly same as the front ones in terms of design and cushioning, except the adjustment options, and the integration of seatbelts. Middle row seats are set a bit higher than those on front (translating into more body-roll feeling too), the headroom and legroom are sufficient. Air conditioning all-round is brilliant and it’s actually the middle row occupants who will love the mood lighting. Middle row space is discussed in more detail in pictorial review.

Third row access is exactly like the previous gen car and that is quite good. Seats fully tumble and fold and I tell you, you don’t need to be a yoga master to enter the third row. Not for saree clad women and elderly though. Third row, although better than the competition (Hexa betters it though) but still is far from comfortable. Just like the third row is supposed to be, the third row of Crysta also is tight on space, poor legroom, just acceptable thigh support and has poor headroom too. Surprisingly the company has offered the headrest for a middle passenger too. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Diesel Engine Performance



The 2.4L Diesel

Mated with a 5-speed manual gearbox, the MT variants get a 2.4 liter Diesel engine, that has a peak power output of 148 BHP (@3400 rpm), and a peak torque output of 343 Nm (@1400 rpm), with ARAI certified FE numbers ticking at 15.10 Kmpl. This engine is smaller than the outgoing engine, still producing around 50% more power and around 70% more torque than the engine it replaces. In terms of NVH, it is definitely better than what we had in the previous gen car, it is just more muted. Rest it still shakes on the start and the gear lever will still give you a vibration therapy (which RWD doesn’t, till this price point?)

Depress the clutch pedal and tap on start button. It that an earthquake? Nope; that’s a car-quake. The gear lever violently shakes at its place along with the cabin (gearbox is mounted with engine after, all to the frame) and that lever will remain shaky throughout. Not an issue, to be very precise; RWD LF UVs are like that only. That said, the clutch is on the lighter side and progressive in action, which definitely makes me happy. Adding to this, are the ECO and PWR driving modes, since the modes work in exactly same fashion in all three engine options we have tested, so we will discuss them at a later stage.

If you have owned the old gen Innova, then better rewire your brain before hitting the gas. Else this car is gonna surprise you by the way it puts down the power and torque. What has been the forte of Toyota diesel engines is their tractable nature and this engine follows the tradition really well. I just never, never ever shifted to the first gear. Every time I drove the car from standstill, it was in second gear. Speed breakers are easy to pass even for a low displacement diesel second cog, bigger rumble strips get tricky, especially when front wheel is in trough and rear one hits. I stopped the car there (believe me, XUV gave up), engaged the second and released the clutch. Initially it hesitated and a fell in idle revvs was observed, then Mr. ECU detected the chances of a stall and revs rose again, so did the front and rear wheels on the strips. Yes, Innova passed over it; with a hiccup, but still impressed us. With peak torque coming in at just 1400 RPM, we were surprised by the number of gearshifts the Innova crysta demanded , you can climb hills at 35 Kph in third cog; not a single hiccup.

You can drive on the highways right from 60 Kph to top speed in fifth cog itself. 100 kph comes smack in between 2000 and 2500; around 2250 RPM. 120 is seen somewhere around 2700 RPM and 140 Kph is seen somewhere around 3100 RPM itself in fifth gear. The older car used to do 100 Kph itself at over 2750 RPM mark. That said, the acceleration is brisk and even after you cross the 140 Kph mark, there is no tailing off in power. The Innova Crysta 2.4 still keeps on accelerating strongly and it’s only after you cross the 3750 RPM mark, you may feel that there is a tail off in the power delivery, don’t ask me where the needle is at that moment. 100 kph, for an instance came a shade over 13 seconds with 5 on board and AC on, which was the best we could manage. And taking the load into consideration, one can easily expect 1 second progress to 100 kph with drive on board, AC OFF and right shifts.

Kitna deti hai? As per MID readings, the fuel efficiency we achieved is as follows:

  • City ECO: 11.2 Kpl

  • City PWR: 9.0 Kpl

  • Highway ECO: 15.8 Kpl

  • Highway PWR: 10.4 Kpl

The 2.8L Diesel

Mated to the 6-speed slushbox AT is the 2.8 liter Diesel engine, that has a peak power output of 172 BHP @ 3400 RPM, and a peak torque output of 360 Nm (1200 - 3400 RPM), with ARAI certified FE numbers ticking at 14.29 Kpl. The 2.8l block is the same that we have got in the new gen Fortuner, albeit with a lower state of tune. The biggest differentiator with 2.4l is the NVH, especially due to the feeling of the shaky gearbox of 2.4, which is replaced by an auto ‘box here. At the start, the cabin shakes for sure but the NVH is actually good, at least the idle NVH. The overall insulation is better and you actually feel better in the brown and black cabin of the 2.8 as compared to the all black one that you get in the 2.4. Overall, the NVH, interior quality and the engine, they all do justify the premium pricing of the 2.8.

The six speed torque converter automatic promises a proper jerk free driving experience. The vehicle crawls at 7-8 kph speeds and that is good enough for city drives. Mind you, the throttle isn’t lightening quick to respond, there will always be a gap of half a second between when you put your foot down and the engine responds, well manageable and quite common too. Okay, talking business, this is a proper big bore boy and the peak torque comes at as low at 1200 RPM itself. This is one such an impressive block that whatever way and at whatever speed you drive it (Sane speeds I mean), put your foot down and the UV starts moving ahead with an impressive brute force (nothing matches it, absolutely nothing). Super tractable and impressively fast people mover this 2.8l engine equipped Toyota is.

The beauty of this engine and gearbox is actually their smoothness of operation and relaxed nature, if you love sudden bursts of power and acceleration, then better look at some DSG, this gearbox takes its own sweet time to decide the ratio. It is always like, bury the right foot, wait 1.5 seconds, it will shift two gears; one after another, and the actual performance comes in. But..and a big but indeed, when the performance comes in, you are literally riding on a never ending torque wave. That said, in the sixth gear, 100 kph comes somewhere around 1650 RPM and 120 comes smack at 2000 RPM mark. Press further and you get to see 150 kph right at 2500 RPM, with a strong but sporty sounding engine noise coming into the cabin coupled with some tyre noise.

Well, give up? No ways, press it further and you will be surprised by the way this car even goes past the 180 kph mark, that said; we had backed off as the empty and elevated stretch of the expressway was over. But yes, don’t try to check the top whack of this 2.8 on public roads. Take note, this gearbox is not tuned to drop more than one gear at a time and hence there will always be a downshift like one and then two; don’t expect third, it won’t do that and it even doesn’t need to do that either. In our performance runs, we managed to hit 100 Kph in around 11.3 seconds with 5 on board and AC on. We won’t be surprised to find out this car hitting the tonne under 10.3 seconds though, maybe even 10.0 itself.

Kitna deti hai? As per MID readings, the fuel efficiency we achieved is as follows:

  • City ECO: 10.2 Kpl

  • City PWR: 6.6 Kpl

  • Highway ECO: 16.0 Kpl

  • Highway PWR: 9.2 Kpl [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Petrol Engine Performance



The 2.7L Petrol

Mated with an option of 5-speed MT or 6 speed slushbox AT, is the 2.7 liter Petrol engine, which has a peak power output of 166 BHP (@5200 RPM), and a peak torque output of 245 Nm (@4000 RPM), with ARAI certified FE numbers ticking at 9.89 Kmpl and 10.83 Kmpl for its manual and automatic versions, respectively. The old, proven, not very rev happy and VVT-I equipped 2.7l block has been offered by Toyota for the petrol buyers. Although this is an old block, it is known internationally for its bulletproof reliability too. What Toyota has added is variable valve timing and this beast of an engine is ready to pull the Innova Crysta petrol.

The first question that comes into mind is how will a petrol engine perform in a 2+ tonne MPV (loaded with passengers)? You’ll be surprised, trust me. This high displacement petrol is the engine that packs a good number of surprises. In fact, for a customer who lives in NCR, has a running of 500 kilometers per month or 750 kilometers per month, planning to keep the car for a long term (diesels have a life of 10 years now) and buying the Innova Crysta for the comfort and some occasional touring. If you belong to this category, then Innova Crysta petrol is the car for you. NVH is awesome and both the diesel motors feel crude in front of this creamy petrol in terms of NVH as well as smoothness of operation.

So you need smoothness and silence of operation, drive inside Delhi, want to keep the car for 10+ years (only petrol can be kept in Delhi now), and drive 500-750 kilometers a month and prefer occasional bursts of power. Close your eyes and buy this car. The NVH is definitely not Hyundai level, but it is way better than the diesels. This 2.7l petrol is one with a proper big bore, hence torque is not an issue. This engine has enough guts to pull like a diesel and keep the enthusiast inside you happy with its power delivery, handling and engine note (it even shakes like old American muscle cars if you push the engine to 5000 while parked). :biggrin:

Slot the gear selector into D mode and let the car crawl, all good for city traffic. Hit highway or hills and it won’t let you down anywhere. Just like the 2.8, this engine also is let down by a slow automatic, which takes a second or two to convert the order that you gave by the heavy foot to actual performance. The gearshift pattern while downshifting is also exactly same for this automatic too. Put your foot down and it shifts one gear down, then one more and this road liner starts moving ahead with some arrogance. 100 Kph can be seen at around 1900 RPM in sixth cog and there is absolute silence at that time. We saw 120 coming at around 2250 RPM, 140 Kph at around 2650 RPM and 160 came a shade above 3000 RPM mark.

What differentiates this engine from its diesel sibling is the way it delivers the power. Push hard and you will notice that initially it has to be the diesel all the way and once the petrol is in its peak band, it demolishes the 2.8 diesel in no time. While the acceleration and torque delivery of the diesel seems to be flat, it’s petrol which will excite the enthusiast in you. Higher the tacho needle goes, sweeter the engine note gets and the power delivery keeps getting stronger and stronger, you want to pull even harder and the upshift happens at a shade below 6000 RPM. Smack, you are back onto the back of 166 petrol powered mad horses, they push back into the seat again. Want to push further? The speedo needle will this time make your eyeballs come out of their sockets.

While trying 0-100 runs, we managed to do 100 either at 12 seconds or a shade above it (again, 5 on board and AC on), since initial starting of NA petrol cars is normally more effected by the load, we expect 1 second benefit with one on board and AC off – that’s a respectable figure for a 2 tonne people mover anyways. In a parallel run against a 2.8 AT, we could easily notice the factors those make 2.8 quicker to 100 Kph. It's noticeable that starting is where the diesel definitely has an upper hand due to massive torque, even before the petrol car reaches 30 kph, the 2.8 diesel feels it'll be beyond the sight within a minute.

After that the petrol car slowly catches up, but till then the 100 is already crossed with diesel being the quicker. It's around 120 Kph when petrol car will be again running parallel to its diesel counterpart and then 2.8L is overtaken. At this moment, the petrol is running at its peak with the progress being very strong, the 2.8 is completely defeated in front of this 2.7 petrol. So if you love only occasional bursts of power, the petrol is for you and if your concern is a quick power delivery – always, then look at 2.8 diesel. The 2.7 isn't far back though, it's also surprisingly quick for a naturally aspirated petrol.

Kitna deti hai? Here lies the real surprise. We were expecting 6-7 Kpl overall, but this motor surprised us with its frugality (for a 2.7 petrol + slushbox combo). As per MID readings, the FE we achieved is as follows:

  • City ECO: 9.2 Kpl

  • City PWR: 6.1 Kpl

  • Highway ECO: 13.4 Kpl

  • Highway PWR: 8.3 Kpl
This MUV has a 65 liters petrol tank. Even after covering 613 kilometers, we had a range of 119 kilometers being displayed in the MID, this translates into 11.23 kpl fuel economy overall, so the ARAI figure of 10.83 is quite reliable for what is on offer. Adding to all the performance on offer is the performance customization option called ‘drive modes’. These are basically 2 different maps on which you can run your car while on the move, as per your driving requirements. The behavior of the vehicle and the way the performance change is expected when you switch between the modes is similar; hence we put them here at once.

  • Normal Mode: This is your regular map; neither it runs on economical tune nor the power heavy one. Default mode and is perfect for driving around the 2.4 diesel car.

  • Economy Mode: Can be activated by pressing the ECO button (Upper section of MID will display ‘ECO’) on the center fascia. The ECO mode blunts the performance quite noticeably but will make your engine go an extra kilometer in every liter of fuel quite easily. For an instance, our FE numbers are all recorded in ECO mode and PWR mode only. Reports claim that ECO mode blunts the AC performance too, unfortunately it’s already winter, so that couldn’t be thoroughly tested. Overall this is the mode in which you will be mostly driving your 2.8D / 2.7P versions. The engines themselves are so powerful that even if you are driving ‘economically’, then also you can manage to be quickest in the traffic. Whenever you switch off the engine in this mode, it will start back in the same.

  • Power Mode: Press the PWR button on the center fascia and the throttle response becomes sharper, acceleration becomes considerably stronger and the FE digits on the MID will go for a toss (expect them to be single digit even for 2.4, under heavy foot). What the 2.8 does during high speed overtakes in ECO mode, the 2.4 behaves in that manner in PWR mode. Additionally, this mode won’t be retained if you switch OFF the ignition, like the ECO mode does. Maybe, this is the way of Toyota telling you that this is the ‘fun’ mode and not the regular one. All our acceleration timings are recorded in PWR mode.
The sports mode is basically nothing but some sort of ‘top gear selector’. The actual sports mode for this car is D mode with PWR button pressed. You put the car in S mode and the MID will display S4 on it. You can select S3 or S5 (I mean up and down) by using the lever. Basically this won’t help with acceleration timings, it’s just that the one being displayed on the MID will be your top gear. Neither is worth discussing, nor any useful. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Safety, Braking, Ride & Handling


The previous gen car was known to provide a comfortable ride to its passengers and thankfully Toyota has decided to retain that trait of the Innova. The Innova Crysta rides really well on similar (But softer?) suspension layout, as was on the older car. What we particularly liked is the smoothness of operation and the plush highway ride. That said, you’ll never get the feeling of the carpet ride (read Hexa), and there is always a feeling of what's there on the road. The nose heavy diesels do feel a bit tighter up front, while the petrol has a bit of tinny feel too (I could feel the suspension working). Overall the ride is well-acceptable and there will be really very less to complain. Now since Toyota has shifted to 16”, so the ride is expected to be even better on the Z trims.

In terms of handling, the sharp turn in of the previous car is definitely missing. Maybe a rise in kerb weight is the factor here; the tautness of the previous car is definitely not present. Innova Crysta isn't nervous even on hilly roads; it will hold its line well; going by the ladder frame MPV standards. The ZX variant is also loaded with ESP/ VSC etc gadgetry, that makes it even safer in case of emergency maneuvers, but the body roll exists and that too at scary levels, if you compare with outgoing model. I won't be surprised if an expert driver in an older Innova will beat a novice in Innova Crysta on a hilly road, so much is the difference between the feeling from behind the wheel. Steering is overall weighted between medium to heavy, it feels a bit better on the petrol version though.

Brakes are sharp, confident and stopping power as well as feedback from the pedal are spot on. The Innova Crysta, in any guise, came to a quick stop from 100 Kph under hard braking in a proper straight line without any drama. Nose dive is there (Like any high riding DWB suspension equipped UV), but is well acceptable. So to answer the main question. Toyota Innova ruled its segment for the comfort, reliability and quality it offered. The Innova itself was enjoying a nearly free run, as the competition tried to catch up - Toyota pushed the envelope out of their reach. Did the car impress us? Well, we have no reason not to; it's simply a brilliant and a well-rounded product, but comes only at a premium to rivals. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
Thread Starter #8

TSIVipul

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Toyota Innova Crysta: You'll Love, You'll Loathe & Star Ratings


You’ll Love: [thumbsup]
  • Superb quality and top notch safety features on the ZX trim.

  • Good all-around visibility, proportions and a nimble steering wheel.

  • Spacious and flexible cabin makes Innova a practical people mover.

  • Brilliant after sales support and network of Toyota throughout India.

  • Set of powerful and reliable engines. Particularly 2.8L Diesel and 2.7L Petrol.

You’ll Loathe:
[thumbsdown]

  • Price! Toyota Innova is a now a costlier MPV.

  • Poorly-equipped GX trim. Skips even ICE option.

  • Missing middle-row bench option in top-end ZX trim.

  • Sound quality of audio system is nothing to write home about.

  • Bad fuel efficiency of automatic model. Expect single digit figures in city drives.

Toyota Innova Crysta Star Ratings:

  • Design and Quality.................:

  • Comfort and Features............:

  • Engine and Performance.........:

  • Handling and Ride Quality.......:

  • Safety and Security Levels.....:

  • Overall Fuel Consumption.......:

  • Sales and Service Network.....:

  • Value For Money Factor.........:

  • The Automotive India's Verdict:
Here's how to interpret above ratings: http://www.theautomotiveindia.com/f...ive-india-reviews-star-ratings-explained.html. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 
Thread Starter #9

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Toyota Innova Crysta: Price, Specifications & Brochure

Toyota Innova Crysta Price (Ex.showroom, Delhi):

Petrol

  • GX (MT): Rs.13,98,800

  • GX (AT): Rs.15,09,800

  • VX (MT): Rs.16,82,800

  • ZX (AT): Rs.19,88,300
Diesel

  • G (MT): Rs.14,21,800

  • GX (MT): Rs.15,10,800

  • GX (AT): Rs.16,40,800

  • VX (MT): Rs.17,94,800

  • ZX (MT): Rs.19,89,300

  • ZX (AT): Rs.21,19,300

Toyota Innova Crysta: Specifications:

Petrol

  • Engine: 2694 CC

  • Power: 164 BHP

  • Torque: 245 Nm

  • Transmission: 5 MT / 6 AT

  • Fuel Efficiency: 11.25 Kpl
Diesel

  • Engine: 2393 CC

  • Power: 148 BHP

  • Torque: 343 Nm

  • Transmission: 5 MT / 6 AT

  • Fuel Efficiency: 15.1 Kpl
General Specifications

  • Front Brakes: Disc

  • Rear Brakes: Drum

  • Front Suspension: Double Wishbone

  • Rear Suspension: 4-Link Coil Spring

  • Fuel Tank: 65 Liters

  • Length: 4735 mm

  • Width: 1830 mm

  • Height: 1795 mm

  • Wheelbase: 2750 mm

  • Tyre Size: 205/65 R16

  • Turning Radius: 5.4 m

Toyota Innova Crysta Exterior Colors:

  • Grey*

  • Silver

  • Super White

  • Garnet Red*

  • Avant-Garde Bronze

  • White Pearl Crystal Shine*
Note: Asterisk (*) denotes our preferred choice of colors. [[iurl='official-road-tests/28190-toyota-innova-crysta-review-pictures-crystalline-innovation.html#post525484']Top[/iurl]]
 

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Thread Starter #10

TSIVipul

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Toyota Innova Crysta: Videos Review

The MID of Innova Crysta is loaded with tech. Here's all what you can access through it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5eCKvrs5T8

The NVH is acceptable but petrol engine noise filters in. In the background, one can easily hear the noise of pebbles hitting the wheel well.

There is no insulation hence the annoying sound. Additionally, the suspension noise is also well evident, shakes of camera indicate the ride quality.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5s0A4fneHs
 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Pictorial Review

Top end variants get a keyless entry and go (push button start). Keyfob itself is nicely designed. But, not like that of VAG cars; even their keys also feel well built.



The low-beam is an LED projector and so are the parking lights. High-beam is halogen though. New headlamps are more stylish and functional anyways.



Headlamp upper section extrudes a bit out from the hood. Notice the wide panel gap at shut line.



The gap was wide enough for me to put my finger in it.



Turn indicator and fog lamp are clubbed together (but are separate units). Take care when you tailgate auto rickshaws etc or hit a dog.



Tail lamps are horizontally stacked. Newly positioned indicators indeed look stylish.



These minor extrusions not only enhance aerodynamics (as per Toyota engineers) but also serve as design elements.



Sleek yet large ORVMs offer excellent rear visibility.



And they are biker friendly too.



Equipped with puddle lamps which are not-so-functional, I wish they were a bit brighter or mounted on the lower section of doors.



High mounted stop-lamp is white, equipped with red LEDs.

 
Thread Starter #12

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Toyota Innova Crysta: Pictorial Review

The wipers are functional and offer decent windshield coverage. The washers are neatly tucked in the cowl.



Front washer is a spray not stream. The rear washer is neatly tucked under the spoiler but skips auto-function.



Shark fin antenna looks a bit out of place on a people mover, still good. The spoiler is well sized and adds a lot to the side profile.



Nearly non existent rear bumper. If a bus, truck or SUV huts from back; don't be surprised to find a damaged bootlid.



Only two sensors and those also more center biased. Be watchful of surroundings while reversing.



The alloy wheels look chic. Toyota has now anyways, made the 16" standard for Crysta shod with 205 section tyres.

This step was taken to improve the ride in higher variants and fix tyre damage complaints that were reported online.



All variants get a proper under hood insulation



Huge gap behind the front grille, may look flimsy but is well put together. Minor frontal hits may result in grille replacement at most.



Weird position of brake fluid reservoir. I'm unable to understand that how will one refill without opening the upper panel.



Only one tow hook on rear left side.



Left: Underbody rear, the spare is an alloy wheel. Right: Under body front, there is proper under engine guard. Notice two front tow hooks.



Upper row: Non insulated wheel wells result in the sound of pebbles hitting the wheel well, reach the cabin - very annoying.

Lower left:
AC compressor located behind the rear bumper on right, is prone to damage in case of a medium to hard hit.

Lower right:
The front suspension is the rugged double wishbone type.



 
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TSIVipul

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Toyota Innova Crysta: Pictorial Review

Request button on the boot, press and you'll listen the motor whine while it releases or shuts the boot.



Request sensors are chrome-finished. This ain't a poorly finished chrome layer. I tried to scratch it with a pen but it didn't.



Doors open nice and wide, good quality materials used and armrests, buttons etc are ergonomically located.



Power windows get one touch operation with anti-pinch. Angled edges make it convenient to operate. Good attention to detail.



Door pockets can easily accommodate half-liter bottles and slim 1-liter bottles too.

Middle row center cup holder is flimsily built though and stands a chance of damage if 3rd row occupants come out or get in via middle of captain seats.



Steering wheel just looks awesome and is nice to hold. Panel gaps are w-i-d-e (except that of horn).



This awkward flap behind the wheel is an eyesore.



Gear levers for manual and automatic variants respectively.



Manual versions don't even get a proper dead pedal, the one in automatic is well sized and well placed.



Floor mats get a proper locking functionality.



ECO and PWR mode as well as ESP / TCS off buttons are placed in center console, while the park assist can be switched ON or OFF via button on RHS of dash.



Hood and fuel lid openers are now easy to reach. They are situated on lower RHS side part of the dashboard.



 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Pictorial Review

Front armrest has a deep storage facility.



Smartphone can be parked inside the cubbyhole at the back of armrest, also notice USB and AUX in ports. (The cover was missing in our test car).



There is a lot of space in the cabin for storing knick-knacks



One glass holder provided just next to the steering wheel.



Upper glovebox is cooled and wide. Can easily accommodate six cold drink cans. Lower one is also spacious enough to hold the docs and a tablet



Sun glass holder right in the middle with inner lining.



We love the dashboard finish. SRS Airbags deploy only if you're buckled up. Many cases are reported when airbags refuse to work since occupants didn't buckle up.



Crash safety is top notch. Toyota Innova Crysta is equipped with seven airbags.



Front passenger airbag can be turned off using this switch. It's located on the LHS of dash, once you open the front left door.



Middle row occupants don't get height adjustable seat belts unlike the front row occupants. Seatbelts are a bit far back from the second row too.



Third row middle occupant gets roof mounted seat belt



Middle row seat belt buckle is oddly located on the side of seat (in captain seat version). It can be very uncomfortable to buckle up for people with large frames.



Middle row gets ISOFIX anchorage



Regular child lock system is easy to operate. With children also getting smarter these days, I'd have preferred a key operated one.



The middle row occupant on left, can pull this stubby lever to push the front passenger seat ahead, to attain some more legroom, on an already roomy car.



Higher trims get engine start stop button. Pressing and holding this button on the move will also work as a master shut down button.

This method can be used for an emergency shut down, cruise control failure for example.




The instruments look neat and classy with new backlit fonts and varied depths.

The upper left is of the petrol car with redline at 5500 RPM, while the lower right is from the diesel car with redline at 4500 RPM.



Left side controls on the steering wheel are for audio and Bluetooth telephony control, while the ones on the right are for MID controls.



Stalks are reasonably well built. The left one is for wiper controls while the right one is for headlamps and turn indicator controls.

The cruise control stalk is given separately on the steering wheel on the right hand side.



Handbrake is well finished with a decent quality leather boot



Sunvisors offer vanity mirror with illumination



Cool blue ambient lighting is provided with illumination adjustment



Lighting controls at the front top. Additionally, the dome lamp in center as well as side mounted lamps with well finished operating buttons are provided.


 
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Toyota Innova Crysta: Pictorial Review

Automatic headlamps and climate control sensors are placed just under the windscreen



Chrome finished inner door latches look premium.



Mid-row occupants get mobile phone charging point at the lower back of armrest. Charger is prone to damage in case of careless feet movements.



The quarter glass is more of a gimmick and doesn't help much with the visibility.



ICE is a responsive touch screen with a host of features, but sound quality is below average.



Tweeters are neatly mounted on the doors.



Media card for navigation



Automatic climate control buttons awkwardly face towards the roof. Fit and finish is premium though.



There is a seamless brushed aluminum finished piping that starts at right AC vent and ends at left one. Both vents are shaped differently.




Rear occupants get their dedicated auto-climate controls and ambient lighting switches. Gladly no more sliders or rollers for ACC controls.



IRVM is not auto dimming, but offers decent rear visibility.



This is the view that driver gets if he looks back



Driver's seat is 8 way electrically adjustable in higher trims. 3rd row occupants get an upper arm for second row adjustment lever (captain seat versions). Neat and thoughtful.



Driver's seat is supportive and well bolstered with good headroom and legroom



Second row offers decent comfort with well supportive seats. Shown below is the maximum and minimum legroom available for middle row.



Middle row occupants get this 10 Kg load rated tray. Make sure to fold if not in use because it's strong enough to cause injuries upon an impact.



Seats can be reclined to form a complete bed, although not a very comfortable one.



Middle row window rolls down completely.



Third row is tight on legroom, headroom and thigh support. Better than the competition, it's still best suited for kids.




Enough boot space with third row in place for weekend luggage of 7 people. Observe the neat placement of 3rd row middle passenger headrest.



Tool kit with jack neatly tucked behind the plastic panel on the left of boot.



Middle and third rows can be folded for house shifting.



Hook to hold third row in place



With third row seats folded and tucked with hook, middle row can't be reclined anymore.



Apparently only this badge distinguishes between the engine variants.



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