Mahindra Quanto Review | Test Drive | Pictures


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The name Quanto derives from the word ‘Quantum’. Mahindra has used it with the intention of showing “more” (In context to more value and space). Ending the name with ‘O’ is also quite obvious since Mahindra had to ensure that the street talk continues. Translating this to something more practical, it means Quanto indeed has the most volumetric space at sub four meter length. A 5+2 seater in such a short length could be tempting proposition especially for the budget buyers and cab segment.

The origins of the Quanto root from the Ingenio platform announced in 2006 and then subsequently launched in 2009 as what we all know today - Mahindra Xylo. The Quanto is essentially a Xylo shrunken to four meter length. This car is based on the same platform and shares the exact same wheelbase as well. Thanks to Indian excise duty structure, we have a unique fledgling segment of sub-four meter cars. Hence, Quanto makes an easy business case for Mahindra at just a 100 crores investment by reusing many components/structures which were already designed for Xylo.

Crossovers have been breaking all conventions. Just find any fancy alphabet and use it in conjunction with a UV and create a unique proposition. We have seen so much of it lately and the Quanto has been Mahindra's contribution. Mahindra positions Quanto to someone preferring to drive a hatchback or an entry level sedan for its fuel efficiency and compact dimensions while at the same time a capable highway cruiser which can take on abuse as well. That’s the reason its TV commercials highlight ‘Live the weekend life’ slogan to position Quanto as a modern lifestyle utility vehicle.

However, we also believe that it does have a considerable potential amongst the taxi segment too due to its nature. i.e. maximum seats, minimum price, reliability, low maintenance and reasonable fuel consumption coupled along with a wide service network. This Mini-Xylo boasts of a twin scroll turbocharger which is first of its kind in India. Interestingly, the cars which use this technology on the global map include Mazda RX7, Mitsubishi Evolution, Renault Megane and BMW 3 Series to name a few. The rumor mill indicates that Mahindra tested both, VGT and Twin Scroll but the latter passed the test.

This mCR100 unit as the engine is aptly named churns out respectable 100PS with the 1.5 liter engine again derived from the Xylo minus one cylinder. Yes you read it right. This is a 3 pot engine derived from the M-Hawk 2.2L mated to a five speed gearbox. Mahindra is offering the Quanto in total four variants:

> C2 (Base)

> C4 (Middle)

> C6 (Middle + ABS)

> C8 (Top end + ABS & Airbags)

We tested the C8 version and therefore, this review will focus more on the C8 version.

The ‘Compact SUV’ stamp on Quanto is largely attributing to a tailgate mounted spare wheel which is a typical jeep DNA. Moreover, the burgeoning compact SUV market has led Mahindra to make this move rather than calling it a mini MUV (as it is indeed a mini Xylo). Apart the Thar, a lifestyle 4x4 vehicle, Mahindra does not have ‘proper’ urban compact hard top SUV offering yet to take on the Ford Ecosport and Renault Duster. But the good news is that it’s in under the works with codename S101 (More: Link).

Just like the latest Mahindra offerings, Quanto’s top-end variant is loaded with features: Digital drive assist system (DDAS), Micro Hybrid Stop-Start tech, 2 DIN audio system compatible with SD / USB / Aux in, Dual airbags, ABS with EBD etc. Both, Xylo and Quanto are produced at the Nashik facility and Mahindra have a flexible demand based production system for the siblings. The Quanto however has been outselling the Xylo month on month since inception (barring March 2013). Mahindra hasn’t been able to really challenge the benchmark Innova from Toyota, so the Quanto also helps in offsetting and needless to say catering to a lower segment than the Xylo. Mahindra has managed to cover all major UV segments from the Quanto to Ssanyong Rexton with some slight overlaps which is inevitable. No wonder why they continue to top the UV sector in India.

Note: The Automotive India was one of the first online publications to report an exhaustive launch of coverage of Mahindra Quanto: Link.


 
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Mahindra Quanto Looks and Design


Look-wise from the front it appears nearly the same as Xylo, leave aside a few cosmetic changes and it’s quite difficult to distinguish Quanto from its sibling. Though it’s clearly not going to win any beauty contests due to the ubiquitous Xylo fascia and ballooned up Maruti Wagon-R’s side stance. Mahindra has done a lip augmentation job - it’s anyways the “in” trend nowadays. Dimension wise, it has the same width as that of Xylo but with marginally lesser height which gives Quanto a good road presence. There’s minimal use of chrome accentuation which doesn’t make it look cheap either. Tailgate mounted spare wheel enclosed with a stylish plastic cover helps this car to look somewhat more proportionate.

Nevertheless, looks are subjective and the market positioning as a budget 5+2 seater is the real USP of Quanto. Considering its sub four meter length, Quanto appears fairly bigger; it’s also wide enough at 1850mm. Yet 15” six spoke alloy wheel does seem undersized for something of this proportion. The doors open wide and are heavy, however coupled with the side steps, it’s isn’t much difficult to ingress and egress. I did find the side step design good and it was easy even for small kids to get up the vehicle without assistance. The roof rails (which have the provision to fit a carrier) attempt to add sporty looks. The windows are large and aid for a clear all-around visibility.

side-view.JPG

Quanto’s rear is where it looks the most SUVish. Plastic spare wheel cover is given an attractive silver and black paint combo (with a clear intention of cosmetic appeal). A funky Quanto badge adorns the tailgate. Its rear door is again wide enough to access the jump seat area. All door handles are broad pull type reminiscent of the designs made famous from the 70s. The rear pillars are blackened and the design seems to be picked up from the XUV with the tail lights integrated neatly. If not for the rear foot step, Quanto could have had a nice departure angle as the wheel is nearly next to the bumper with no overhang.

Paint and build quality is decent for the segment and underpinnings are robust, while there are some odd panel gaps – it isn’t tough to overlook them considering the price paid for it. However, Mahindra Quanto weighs too much with kerb weight of whopping 1,640 Kgs. Look at this to compare:

> Premier Rio: 1,145 Kgs

> Maruti Ertiga: 1,235 Kgs

> Mahindra XUV500: 1,785 Kgs

You will read in depth about it in the performance section of this review.

 
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Mahindra Quanto Interiors and Comfort


The interiors is essentially grey, no pun intended but literally! Primarily a lot of grey tone is used in the dashboard, seats, even carpet. Mahindra calls it a granite interior theme. Dashboard design is similar to Xylo, it’s a quirky dashboard design but functional. The plastic quality is decent and is well put together; our test vehicle clocked nearly 7,000 Kms but it didn't sport any rattles. It certainly provides a ‘built to last’ feeling for typical Indian conditions. On center of the dashboard, you will find DDAS that shows varied information such date, time, temperature, fuel consumption, gear indicator, speed etc. Primarily this feature has three screens which can be toggled using the mode button:

> Screen 1: Temperature (inside and outside), speed, gearshift indicator and time.

> Screen 2: Date, average fuel consumption and time.

> Screen 3: Time, date and distance to empty meter.

In fact, there is also a speed warning alarm (which was annoyingly set to 49 Kmph in the test vehicle). Every time you reach the specified speed, DDAS blinks the figures and sounds an alarm note. It can only be adjusted when system blinks at the preset speed using the mode and set buttons. The driver would definitely find this difficult to change while he is driving. As a feature it is welcome, but the way to control and set it is definitely inconvenient. On the other hand, you also get a door open warning alert at speed above 10 Kmph and the best part is that it would show the exact door which isnt properly shut.
Nippon’s dual DIN head unit and HVAC controls form part of the central console. This head unit supports MP3, radio, SD card, Aux-in and USB. It’s a decent setup (available on C6 and C8 variants) coupled along with four speakers and a couple of tweeters. Quanto’s air conditioner is a chiller. More so for the front row with 4 vents facing the driver and passenger, the centre vents are powerful, quirky triangular in shape while the corner ones are round and classy. Apart from front vents, there are no vents separately for the second row and the jump seat areas. With 5 plus passengers and on bright summer afternoon, switching the blower at high speed will be required even if it means freezing the front passengers to please the second row occupants.

Fortunately blower is not too noisy at high speeds. All vents can be closed individually however rubber quality of the vent controller could have been better. A ‘low’ mode is provided with the AC which shuts off the compressor for efficiency. The start stop button (which Mahindra calls Micro hybrid technology) and hazard lamps are placed between the central AC vents. Start Stop system is standard in all except the base version - works well and handy at traffic signals requiring patience. Point of this feature is that the engine auto shuts off within a few seconds when you are standstill with the clutch released and gear lever in neutral position. You can simply restart the car by depressing the clutch pedal. A word of caution: Using it judiciously will prevent unnecessary strain on the starter motor and battery. The gear lever is tall and does vibrate a bit on idling and on the start / shut off of engine. Reverse Assist is standard on the C8 version and integrated with the IRVM. The roof lights (with theatre effect) are available on passenger + driver side and a sun glass holder on the roof in front is a thoughtful touch too.


Instrument cluster has total three circular dials: Tachometer, speedometer and the third one hosting both engine temperature and fuel indicator. The needle sway across the dials with the key turned to the on position. Simple non fussy design with LCD console showing the trip meters. Trip meter also has an AC meter showing the distance run with the AC on, this cannot be tripped manually but it resets itself at a lakh kms automatically - A handy thing if you are a cab operator and wish to charge your customers differently with and without air conditioner usage.

Steering on the top-end C8 resembles to that on the Mahindra Scorpio (minus steering controls) with adequate horn vocals. On the other hand, versions below C6 carry the steering design from Xylo with chrome Mahindra logo. To the right of steering there is a fuel lid opener, head lamp adjustment and electric controls to adjust both the ORVMs. You will find almost the similar looking controls in different Mahindra vehicles in order to keep component manufacturing costs in check. Personally, I found the headlamp / wiper stalk quality relatively better than XUV500.

Gear lever stands tall and vibrates on start up and settles down at idling. Twin cubby holes in the centre console to keep a bottle or a cup are pretty handy. There are bottle holders in both the front doors as well. Recesses provided near the handbrake region are good to keep a mobile or keys and also a small storage area available. Plastic quality of dashboard is good but in some other places like this storage or middle row cup holder, fit and finish could have been better. The illuminated glove box is of an average size with a separate slot to hold pens.

Front seats are the best place to be in a Quanto. They are most comfortable among the lot and come with decent thigh support as well. The seats are decently contoured and driver’s seat offers a high position with all round visibility. Front seats are 4 way adjustable and provide decent comfort for long journeys too. All seats are fabric and again grey in color with yellow stripes. Mahindra really needs a good color and plastic contour consultant - all of their vehicles sport quirky unconventional colors - it’s time to bring them out in some eye pleasing shades and tones. Even though quality can be termed acceptable it’s simply not appealing, fit and finish also could be better at certain places. A thin dead pedal is provided which does help in long distance driving but obstructs once a while when you move feet off the clutch pedal. Secondly, seat belt lock positioning with respect to armrest takes some getting used to. If you engage the reverse gear, it nearly hits the arm rest. The driver door locking / unlocking buttons have to be reached out using your left hand instead. So some ergonomics could have been better.


Rear seats are a bit bland and upright. Probably because jump seats need placing behind, there is only so much space available in a sub-four meter car. The legroom is adequate and the floor is flat but with slightly lesser thigh support. Mahindra Quanto is wide enough for 3 people to easily accommodate in the rear seat, though the centre person might find the rear cup holder a bit intrusive. Front visibility from second row is good as well. The seat however feels flat and can do better with some contouring. No neck restraint in middle could be another grievance for the middle passenger. Charging ports are available on all three rows in the C6 and C8 variants. Front seat backside has map pockets and also airplane style foldable trays and cup holders. These trays when open further increase the knee space to an extent. Overall, the cabin is extremely airy space wise for size of the vehicle also thanks to the large glass areas.

Second row seats doesn’t fold at all, it is an opportunity missed by Mahindra since it would have offered further flexibility to the Quanto. There is enough place under the rear seats to push in some luggage, briefcase and laptop bags can be easily hidden underneath and away from the prying eyes of mischief makers. Rear door pockets are small and have no cup holders. The jump seats aren’t exactly the most comfortable thing but will serve for the occasional travel. Safety concerns apart, two kids can sit easily or two adults under 5 7" can snug in. If you are broad shouldered then the handle bars will be intrusive. Getting in and out third row is easy with the help of footsteps. Thankfully, rear door also feature child lock along with the second row doors. With the jump seats folded, you have a huge 690 liters boot that could easily swallow your international travel bags too. How many sub-four meter vehicles can boast such sort of boot space? Indeed, space is one of the major USPs of Quanto.

 
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Mahindra Quanto Performance and Safety


Heart of Mahindra Quanto sports a 1.5 L (1493 CC) three-cylinder 12-valve turbo diesel engine, known as mCR100. It produces 98.6 BHP (74 kW / 100 PS) @ 3750 RPM and develops 240 Nm (177 lb ft) torque @ 1600 – 2800 RPM. The engine is mated to a five speed 5MT320, indirect shift manual transmission. Perhaps this is where the Indian carmaker spent most of its engineering acumen as far the Quanto goes.

Deriving a three pot engine out of the bread and butter 2.2L M-Hawk and then mating it with twin scroll turbocharger is a commendable engineering achievement. I’m quite sure this engine will find its way in other Mahindra small vehicles in future. The intercooler is placed on top of the engine and some fancy pipework routing via the bonnet. It’s all helpful in cooling the compressed air from the twin scroll turbocharger. The two slots beside Mahindra’s logo channel the air through bonnet towards the inter-cooler. This position of intercooler however makes the oil dipstick a bit hard to reach.

Engine bay size is identical to the Xylo and Mahindra could have retained the 2.2L engine too. However, this technology seems to have made a wider business proposition for them given the size and positioning of Quanto. A twin scroll turbocharger is Mahindra engineering claim to fame, instead of taking a usual VGT route. To explain this simplistically, a dual stage turbocharger is not two physical turbos, but alternates in sets between exhaust outputs from different cylinders and produces (at different angles) a controlled turbine blade movement. Thereby turbine efficiency is better and lag is minimal. The engine bay is snugly fit and Mahindra has worked adequately on the refinement of the 3 potter. The engine starts with a clatter and vibrations which are clearly felt but it settles to a more acceptable idle once warmed up. At idle it’s acceptably silent on the interiors with windows upped. Though noise interference at 3 digit speeds can be felt, but this is more wind noise than that of the engine itself. The wind noise insulation could have been better all in all.

Whilst engineers did a great job with mCR100 engine, the car’s weight plays a spoilsport at times. In terms of performance, the engine has a Jekyll and Hyde characteristic to it. Stay out of the turbo band and you will feel what’s wrong with the car, come to the turbo zone and it transforms in to a different car altogether. This is true with most turbos but just that you are reminded more of it in the Quanto. The biggest tip I would share for Quanto owners is to rev enough and remain in the turbo band. Conservative drivers will need to rev higher and shift later – Of course, you get used to this within a few days of driving the Quanto and that’s when it begins feeling peppy. It can cruise comfortably at 120 Kmph all day. Power tapers beyond once you go higher from that range and you are reminded this is a heavy car with a three pot engine. There are situations you need to adapt to, especially if you are driving at a low speed in second gear and need to negotiate a sudden incline. You will have to shift to first(unless you are carrying momentum) - while the engine does not die on you easily, the strain is felt at these times. You can feel the lag under 1,500 RPM. Return to turbo zone and the engine feels adequately spirited. We wonder if Mahindra had managed weight what would have been the outcome. Yet I would say, for the purpose this UV is intended for, it’s not underpowered at all. All that you need is to adapt your style of driving at occasions.

Gear lever is tall but gear shift distances are average, neither too long nor too short. It takes a while to get used to the neutral position as it’s awkward compared to what you are typically used to. Gear shift quality could have been better to inspire more confidence. It takes getting a bit used to and then on its fine! Clutch is decent, though slightly on the weighty side. Drive-ability and Torque spread is excellent as long as you shift later (1,900+ RPM) the car feels energetic. With front disc and rear drums, brakes are adequately balanced. C6 version onwards gets ABS + EBD. ABS performed well as intended to. C8 variant has dual air bags for driver and front passenger - we need more and more manufacturers standardizing safety equipment, hopefully we as buyers can make the change happen.

Following are the gear ratios of Quanto:

> 1st Gear: 3.78:1

> 2nd Gear: 2.21:1

> 3rd Gear: 1.42:1

> 4th Gear: 1:1

> 5th Gear: 0.79:1

> Reverse: 3.56:1


 
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Mahindra Quanto Ride and Handling


Suspension is hard, I mean really stiff, probably to compensate body roll. Ride quality isn't an USP in any Mahindra vehicle generally and Quanto is no different. However, I was surprised with its ability to take on the rough terrain; it did at speeds and in aplomb without losing out on composure. Quanto also provided sufficient confidence on rugged abuse. Suspension ‘edges’ are well protected and there is no brutal metal thump at encountering large potholes. Front suspension is a double wishbone IFS setup with torsion type anti roll bar, while rear is a multi (5) link type.

Comfort levels in the front row is best , followed by the flat second row, side facing jump seats can never be comfortable but are more of utility on the odd days. Space wise it’s more of a 5 seater and occasionally can seat 7 with compromised comfort. Headroom / shoulder room is immense in the front two rows and it could get a bit tight with head and shoulder room in the limited jump seat space. Turning radius is alright at 5.4 meters but remember, Quanto is a wide car yet maneuverability is decent. Usual city commute and highway driving will be easy given the high perch position. Plus, you will command respect on the road due to the SUV’ish dimensions and an aggressive face looks.

The doors automatically lock at over 25 Kmph and unlock when the ignition is switched off, if you unlock the vehicle and doors aren’t opened, it again re-locks within 40 seconds. The remote keys are also provided with a search function - helpful for the forgetful people at a parking lot, when pressed the hazard lamps flash along with an alarm, again a click of the key switches off this alarm. The headlamps turn on when the unlock key is pressed twice. Power Windows standard from C4 variant with the C6 and C8 variant also getting driver side express up / down with anti-pinch feature.

Hydraulic power assisted steering wheel feels lifeless and doesn’t provide quick feedback, it does the job reasonably though. The body roll exists but it’s muted when compared with old Xylo. Dynamics are fairly average. Aggressive moments on a tall BOF vehicle are best avoided. If you aren't rallying using the Quanto, you'll be safe. Of course, do not compare to low slung sedans or monocoques. Note the test car sported 205/65 R15 Bridgestone tyres.

 
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Mahindra Quanto Verdict, Likes, Dislikes and Ratings


Overall, Mahindra Quanto emerges as a value for money proposition; it’s the maximum real estate one can buy in sub four segment. While it does not bring out a butch or even classy SUV’ish look, Quanto will tick the box for people who expect maximum utility value in limited budget. Starting at Rs.5.97 Lakh for the C2 and going up to Rs.7.47 Lakh (Ex. Showroom, Mumbai) for the C8 version - You get a frugal and efficient diesel UV. So this does provide an alternative option for people looking around the entry level diesel sedans. Even though it does not boast having the refinement and finesse of a sedan, it will tick the box for those who prefer maximum utility out of a compact car. Since inception, it’s been outselling the elder sibling Xylo with average sales of over last 6 months at around 2400 per month – it still cannot be termed as great success by any measure but given the investment scale it should bring home Mahindra enough ROI. Until Mahindra brings a proper hard top compact SUV for the masses, Quanto will continue to add some weight to the lower end of their portfolio. As a native UV manufacturer, Mahindra have missed the bus in actual “Compact SUV” market with the likes of Renault Duster already ruling the roost. Meanwhile, there are rumors of a 4x4 Quanto in works. Hope they also work on on the weight aspects too. Presently, Quanto has ARAI fuel consumption figures of 17.2 Kmpl. This in itself will offer leverage in the cab sector. Apart from initial three services, Quanto’s service is scheduled at 10,000 Kms intervals / 1 Year (whichever comes earlier).


Likes:
[thumbsup]

  • A compact 5+2 seater UV at a VFM price tag

  • Fuel efficient mCR100 engine coupled along with a twin scroll turbo providing good driveability.

  • Abuse friendly and reliable nature (Thanks to body on ladder chassis).

  • Maximum space utilisation in the sub-four meter cadre. Including additional jump seats.

  • Sufficient amount of functional features as well as safety equipments (DDAS, ABS, Airbags etc)

Dislikes: [thumbsdown]

  • Stiff suspension set up and harsh ride quality.

  • Noise insulation on the higher speeds needs a check.

  • Xylo derived design gives it a awkward stance especially due to the puny tyres.

  • Fit, finish, quality and ergonomics at certain areas could be improved.

  • Second row could be offered with more comfortable and contoured seats. Plus, folding capability.

The Automotive India Star Ratings:


  • Design & Quality:........

  • Comfort Levels:...........

  • Performance:...............

  • Ride Quality:................

  • Handling:.....................

  • Fuel Efficiency:.............

  • Safety:.........................

  • After Sales Service:......

  • Value For Money:.........

Niggle Experienced:

  • Power Window roll up / down driverside locking mechanism didn't function.

 
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Mahindra Quanto Price Comparison and Specifications


Mahindra Quanto Versus Sub-4 Meter Sedans Price Comparison



Mahindra Quanto Segment Price Comparison


Note: Only BS-4 Diesel versions included. Pricing Ex. Showroom, New Delhi.

Mahindra Quanto Features and Specifications

 
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Mahindra Quanto Pictorial Review

Funky 'Quanto' badge. It bears fonts similar to that on New Fiesta.



Hard to distinguish between Xylo and Quanto from front.



Tailgate mounted spare wheel is the major factor contributing to Quanto's butch design.



Side pose - A quirky stance.



The rub rails with chrome inserts look chic (Only on C6 & C8). The footboard assists in comfortable ingress / egress.

rub-rails.JPG

Rear blackened pillar reminds of XUV. Though it also makes Quanto look somewhat more proportionate.



Butterfly windows for the jump seat area. Handy if you chose to travel with air conditioner switched off.



The washer goes bottom up unlike conventional top down spray. It's effective nevertheless. Rear window demister standard on C6 and C8.



Handy footstep for the jump seat area. Note just two reverse parking sensors, their range might be limited.



Attractive plastic spare wheel cover. You can secure the wheel using any small padlock.





An odd looking cap at the rear door housing inner hinge bolts. Access could have been offered from inside the door plastic.



No printed Antenna for the Quanto - However one jutting at the roof.



Front fog lamps standard in C6 and C8 variants.



Mahindra logo form design in the headlamp. Observe the inconsistent panel gaps.



A service indicator (round cap to the left of inter-cooler plastic) provided to check air filter condition. Red color indicates time for a replacement.

IMG_0401.jpg

Twin air vents(on each side of the Mahindra logo) picking air from the front grill and some fancy pipework through the bonnet driving air on to the top of the inter-cooler

IMG_0408.jpg

Recommended fluids sticker slapped straight from Mahindra Xylo.



Six spoke 15" alloy wheels comes standard in C8 variant with tyres speed rated at 180 Kmph.

image.jpg

Quanto underbody view from rear, not much protection or cladding this side. See the rear differentials, Quanto is rear wheel driven.



Some fiber protection on the front end of underbody.



Reverse lamps integrated on bottom of the bumper.



Dead pedal is too thin and a bit clumsy when used in tandem with clutch as it protrudes out on the top corner rather than resting on the floor.



Elegant looking door pad. The lock function comes too close to the driver shoulder and isn't easy to use.



Nice looking circular chrome AC vents, headlamp beam adjustment, fuel lid opener and electric ORVMs control on right side of the steering.



Four way seat adjust for the driver, decently contoured and adequately comfortable, under seat plastic quality could be better.





Quanto Fuse box located conveniently near driver side door on dashboard.

 
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Re: Mahindra Quanto Road Test Drive Review

Quanto has sufficient cubby holes. A couple of them besides the gear lever too.



Life saving airbags present on the C8 version. The steering looks bland due to the use of dull colors.



Illuminated glovebox is not too deep.



Tyre Pressure information. Nice to see some Mahindra humor of putting 7 or more. It's probably going to be the case in rural segment.



Good view from wide ORVMs on both the sides.





Front seat belts are height adjustable.



Sun glass holder is big enough to keep your D&Gs.



Some handy recesses for mobiles / keys and small storage space near the handbrake area.



Illuminated mirror in the passenger side sun visor. Deal maker when it comes to convincing some.



Wiper and light stalks beside the steering. Good quality, functional and easy on the fingers.



Stowage beneath the driver seat. Useful to safely hide expensive items from prying eyes.



Dual DIN Nippon system - Aux in, USB, CD/MP3 and SD Card interfaces available with remote





If you end up keeping keys and coins here, expect them to be lost inside the dash as there's a small crevice where the key goes.

IMG_0300.jpg

Second row door with a small door pocket, child locks standard across all variants



Head on view from second row. The floor is flat even though the Quanto is rear wheel driven.



No headrest for the middle passenger in the second row, notice hooks provided as utility to hang bags.





Grab Handles for the passengers with utility hooks.



With the front front seat at extreme positions - view of the rear leg room, it's adequate by most standards.





Back seat map pockets behind the front seats.



Enough space underneath the second rows to keep some briefcases and laptop bags.



CenterConsole cup holder for the second row with a tacky fit and finish. 12V charger provided in the middle row for all variants.



Airplane style trays for the second row with cupholders.



Fabric Quality is average, colors and contours could have been a more vibrant.



Large 690 litre boot with jump seats folded up.



Nearly 6 feet subject trying out the jump seats, not exactly comfortable. Best for kids or persons under 5 7".

 
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Re: Mahindra Quanto Road Test Drive Review

Nice simple rear door design hosting the rear window washer. The screw looks a bit odd though visually inside circular door handle.



Open the flap to top-up the washer fluid.



Tool box near the rear door lip hosting jack etc.





Small net provided under the jump seats, not a very practical location.



Cup holders beside the jump seats too on both sides.

IMG_0379.jpg

Mechanical override for opening fuel lid in case the electric ones go kaput.



Quanto remote key with functions for lock / unlock and locating the car.



A glance of the cockpit during night.







20130401_102334.jpg

20130401_102350.jpg

Low Beam and High Beam - Overall Beam quality is decent





A shot alongside the Ford Figo and Tata Indica to give an idea of Quanto's road presence.





Some comparative shots with the elder sibling Xylo





(C) The Automotive India. All rights reserved. The text and images cannot be reproduced in any form without written permission of our authority.
 
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350Z

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Re: Mahindra Quanto Road Test Drive Review

Note: Thread now live from T.I.P zone. Needless to mention, this is one of the most comprehensive reviews of Mahindra Quanto on web.

Drive Safe,
350Z
 

Akash

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Re: Mahindra Quanto Road Test Drive Review

Excellent review IR. Feels like I just did a round of the vehicle at the showroom.

I wish M&M had done some more homework on the design part. Although the face and the back of this vehicle looks smart, a quick glance at the side profile leaves an impression that the design team was in a bit hurry to complete the vehicle.

Thanks to your review, I just realised that Quanto is heavier that the bigger Ertiga. Thanks to the 100 horses, or else we would have had a lazy beast in the segment.

BTW I didnt see you mentioning much about the body roll. Is it in the acceptable zone?
 
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Re: Mahindra Quanto Road Test Drive Review

wonderful review IR.

i second your views on the drivability. of the quanto.

having seen some people actually put in more than 7 passengers in the quanto and the driver zipping through narrow lanes. the torque and the twin scroll turbo are the highlight of its drivability.
 
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Re: Mahindra Quanto Road Test Drive Review

Excellent review IR. Feels like I just did a round of the vehicle at the showroom.

I wish M&M had done some more homework on the design part. Although the face and the back of this vehicle looks smart, a quick glance at the side profile leaves an impression that the design team was in a bit hurry to complete the vehicle.

Thanks to your review, I just realised that Quanto is heavier that the bigger Ertiga. Thanks to the 100 horses, or else we would have had a lazy beast in the segment.

BTW I didnt see you mentioning much about the body roll. Is it in the acceptable zone?
Thanks Akash, one would expect body roll as it is derived from the Xylo, however it isnt as pronounced(atleast when compared to the old Xylo) - the suspension definately has been hardened and in way mutes the body roll. For normal daily driving and lane changes there is absolutely nothing to worry, just avoid aggressive mannerisms, the vehicle anyways isnt meant for it.

wonderful review IR.

i second your views on the drivability. of the quanto.

having seen some people actually put in more than 7 passengers in the quanto and the driver zipping through narrow lanes. the torque and the twin scroll turbo are the highlight of its drivability.
Thanks Superbad, indeed twin scroll is well engineered. It should make its way in other smaller(and lighter) Mahindras.
 
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