Indian Car & Bike Magazines


Thread Starter #78

AMG

Suspended
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
4,030
Likes
328
Location
N/A


* Exclusive drive! Nissan Sunny – all-new, Micra-based saloon offers full-size space and practicality for compact money. But just how good is it?

* Scoop! Maruti 800 to make a comeback! We bring you all the inside information.

* Audi Q3 driven: We drive the baby Audi in Zurich.

*Tested: Toyota Etios Liva, Chevrolet Beat diesel, new Ford Fiesta 1.5 Petrol, Audi A6 3.0T

*Shootout: Fiesta diesel takes on rivals Vento, Verna, SX4, and Linea.

* Triple test: Audi’s new diesel A6 vs BMW 530d vs Mercedes-Benz E350 CDI

* Driven: Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale – easily the best Maserati to have hit the road or track in a long time.

* Rickshaw shootout: In an unusual comparison, we pit the Bajaj RE205 against the TVS King, in the shaky battle of three wheels.

* Bikes: We test BMW’s mammoth six-cylinder K 1600 GT. Plus, we show you how ABS on motorcycles can hugely impact rider safety.

* Motorsport: How computers took over F1, and an exclusive visit to the VW Race Polo factory. Plus, European and British Grand Prix race reports.
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2011
Messages
38
Likes
0
Location
Ferozepur
Well I am a fan of autocar india. I think its a great magazine. I get mine shipped all the way to australia (thats how much I like it).
Autocar India is far better than Overdrive but has a strong pro-Honda tilt. Much to my amazement, they bucked the trend and declared the Linea T-Jet as the winner of the Petrol Midsizers' comparo carried in their Nov 2010 issue (Please see the attached file, before that when they had road tested the T-Jet, they wrote 'the Linea just blows away the competition in a strong blast of turbocharged air'), it is clear that they got a strong rap on the knuckles from Honda as a result and they quickly fell back in line.

It was almost as if the T-Jet had been withdrawn from the market. Hormazd Sorabjee the editor started writing things like 'Sad to see that the country's best petrol car of the segment with a gem of an engine that is the stuff of legends, the Honda City, has been suffering with a decrease in units sold due to a substantial hike in the petrol prices - having the best product with the best quality, it seems, is not enough'!!!

In their New Buyers Guide, they have withdrawn the reference to the City lacking in interior quality and in need of fatter rubber and have added 'Driving experience is vital when you buy a petrol mid-sizer and in this crucial area, the City stands head and shoulders above the competition. It is the City that gets our vote for the car to buy.'

They had given us the 70-odd paged free booklet on the ANHC earlier and now have repeated the feat with a 68-page Honda Brio special. No wonder then that they declare at more than one place in the magazine as also in the Brio special that 'The Brio is the first car in its segment to break the 13 second barrier in our 0-100 Kmph acceleration tests'.

In their New Buyers Guide that is carried in the back pages of every issue, they have given the 0-100 Kmph time of 12.04 sec for the Hyundai i10 1.2.

Again, they act almost as if the i10 1.2 has been withdrawn from the market!
 

Attachments

Joined
Dec 15, 2011
Messages
2,536
Likes
1,304
Location
M.P.
Everyone has different tastes and preferences and everyone is entitled to his or her own opinion. But even after knowing this, I am surprised to see that not many replies on this thread favour what I consider the most passionate automobile magazine in India - Business Standard Motoring. I have been reading all kinds of auto mags available in India for the last 18 years and can vouch for the fact that BSM guys are really not after money. One has to read the articles written by these men (and the odd women) to really appreciate how to emote automotive passion into the most lucid english prose. Bijoy Kumar Y (since left BSM to join Mahindra Adventures), Srinivas Krishnan, Pablo Chaterji, Kartik Ware, etc everyone is in a class of his own. Even their ex-writers (Parameswaran, Murali K Menon, Murali Karthik, Sachin Rao, etc) have left such beautiful,indelible impressions on my mind that I can really not think of reading any other auto magazine now because they sound too juvenile and feel tasteless in comparison to what BSM has to offer. This is the only magazine that has/had writers whose quotes I still remember and I guess I would just post one their reviews and let it do the talking to give our forum members an idea about what a lovely magazine this is (review of Royal Enfield Thunderbird Twinspark by BSM Ex-Editor - Bijoy Kumar Y - just look at how beautifully way he concludes this one):


It is a beautiful November morning and there is a nice chill in the air. And I am writing this story instead of riding the wheels off the Royal Enfield Thunderbird Twinspark. That, dear reader, is the failing of the newest Enfield. Actually, you cannot call it a new motorcycle. Nothing with alphabets conjuring up to read Royal Enfield on the tank can be new, right?

There are a few people I would like to introduce to you before I get to this, the first road test of a motorcycle that I have done in ages for this magazine. First of those is a man called Sidharth Lal or simply Sid. He today runs the Eicher trucks but before that he landed himself the golden opportunity to do a Harley-Davidson to Enfield India. He knew the ingredients – a time warped motorcycle engulfed in myth, better quality and there by reliability and bingo, India would have had its very own naked British singles that the world would love to own. Sidharth gave the direction by launching the cruiser, the Thunderbird, an obvious hint at the Harley-cruiser image and a quick way to get established at least in India. And the Thunderbird, which featured an AVL developed engine was much more reliable, had better finish, was more economical and greener than the older 350s and 500s. The rest of the world got motorcycles that looked straight out of the 1950s and 60s while the T-bird was getting more Indians to ‘real’ motorcycling where there are no plastic fairings but only genuine bones to break when you fell down.

The second man who needs no introduction in the automotive circles is Ravichandran – the man who gave unsuspecting Indians the Supra and the Shogun. And the man who helped Bajaj become a serious force in motorcycles. If someone knows how to sell motorcycles in India, it is Ravichandran.

The third block, ahem, has a journalistic background. Sachin Chawan used to regularly crash Royal Enfileds in his effort to go faster when he used to work for Overdrive (I hear). Sachin today works for Royal Enfield and organises rides to far flung parts of Himalayas which has earned him cult status already. He has been sowing the seeds of 22nd century Enfield worship amongst youngsters who normally spend an abnormal amount of time in front of PCs. And last year he rode a heavily modded Enfield, still an Enfield, to third place at he cruel event called Raid de Himalaya. I was there too, driving a new SX4 with a heater, and I saw how Sachin was riding on sheer will power to overcome a nasty fever and a snowstorm.

With people so committed and able on their fold, Royal Enfield should be developing, building and selling better motorcycles. Motorcycles that make me jump out of a bed on any morning and head for the garage, instead of a workstation, right? Alas, they have a lot of work to do, indeed.I have been looking forward to ride T-spark though, since I am in the market for a new motorcycle and there is nothing out there that is big enough for a 5’10, 95 kg homo sapien, Indiene. So it better be another Enfield (remember the Thunderclap? I need something with electric start, hence) – either the 500 LB or the new T-bird. So this test was important in every sense of the word.

The new T-spark, T-bird looks good from almost every angle. It is certainly a cruiser but one in the Moto Guzzi cruiser mould than a Harley-clone way. So you get a raised tank, a massive antler of a handlebar and essential chrome. It has got the correct proportions and there is nothing you want to change. The seating position was comfortable for me, as long as the ride does not last longer than two hours. Well, you do take a break after two hours on our roads in any case. So. The handlebar-foot peg-seat positioning feels good on slow maneuvers and the T-bird is a surprisingly easy motorcycle to ride in traffic – unlike the longer breed of cruisers (have you tried your hands at a Yamaha Royal Star? Any Yamaha Royal Star?). The chrome on the wheels is terrible and was already rotting in the test bike – the rest of bling work is of a better quality though. Mental note: if I buy another Enfield, I will have alloy-wheels on it, however horrible they look – since dogs do pee on motorcycle wheels and there is nothing more I detest corroded wheels and spokes on a motorcycle – any motorcycle.

I am yet to come to terms with the electric starter in the test bike. It makes lots of noises and I had to develop a technique that involves two hands to start the bike without flooding the carb. I was expecting a healthy whump, whump idle and was disappointed at getting a mechanical chatter where every moving part of the new UCE (unit construction engine) was singing to different tunes. Trust me, there is nothing more unbearable than a British single that is out of sync and the only excuse RE can have is the fact that it is NOT a Brit single any more.

First gear engages positively but the clutch release results in a judder that can put the pelvic thrusts of an ageing Rajnikant to shame. You are not supposed to stay in first gear for more than, say, three seconds since vibrations will start shaking your vertebrae loose. On to second and then third quickly and life gets better. And you are really riding a British single all over again. According to Kyle who has been riding all kinds of Brit singles as well as Enfields for years, the roll-on performance of the new T-bird is impressive. And our tests show that it 60 kph in 6.7 seconds and 100 kph in 25.8 seconds. In Enfield terms that is whopping, ok? And for the record it can do a top whack of 108 kph though an optimistic speedo will happily show you 115 plus. Not that you buy Enfields to emulate Hayabusas, still.

On to the final gears and settle down to 70 kph and you are actually enjoying the new Enfield. Sure it will go faster and it can cruise at slower speeds but things are peaceful and more manageable at 70 kph – it will steer, stop and be ready for overtaking at this speed, hence. But what hurts is the mechanical rhapsody that is packaged into this new engine as the speed climbs to 80 and beyond. The exhaust note is inimitably British, but the cacophony is not. May be the test bike was really out of tune as it had been to a Himalayan Odyssey, amongst other things. Vibrations of the tuning fork variety attacks the foot pegs and takes over at 80-100 kph – which is a shame, since you really are enjoying the ride at this point. Surprisingly the vibes don’t get transmitted to the short-arm rear view mirrors that works well. The best way to come to a halt in an Enfield is to reduce your speed through the gear box – which, I must say, worked well for me. There are false neutrals that you can stumble upon every now and then, still. The rear drum is spongy on the feel and good for parking speeds at best. The 280 mm front disc bites with a vengeance though and when combined with the rear drum, provides more than adequate panic-stopping ability to the motorcycle. That said, the braking could get more progressive and may be a better bedded-in pad up front would do wonders.

continued.......
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 15, 2011
Messages
2,536
Likes
1,304
Location
M.P.
....continued

One of the Enfield rides I fondly remember is to Amritsar from Delhi, en route to Lahore, Pakistan. I rode an AVL T-bird and it left very good impression on me. This chassis can handle more cornering forces than what most owners are capable of and the rubber, despite looking a bit thin design-wise, provides decent grip and a sense of solidity to the proceedings. That is good news indeed for those who plan to spend their days exploring winding roads that leads to spectacular sunsets. And the ride quality over bad roads or no-road conditions is best in its class in India.

The engine with hydraulic tappets and an automatic primary chain tensioner apart from the twin-spark ignition will help RE meet future emission norms easily and more importantly it returns 40 kpl (combined cycle) without much effort. So it is an improvement over the single-plug model and hence a landmark for the legendary brand. But I do have a question which I hope will be answered by the three men whom I mentioned at the start of this report. Couldn’t Enfield source a complete single cylinder motor from an established motorcycle maker? May be Yamaha? Alright, if that would have proved expensive, couldn’t RE look at dedicated engine makers like Bombardier? Or develop a single with an established motorcycle maker who would have liked to benefit from cheap labour in India? The point I am driving at is that RE needs a refined, reliable, economical and green engine – and the Twinspark model looks like an interim, unrefined, oil dripping option more than anything else. It could have been done better…period. I can hear the excuses already – we will steadily improve the bike over the years, right? Well, aren’t you bored doing that already?

In short, I would still rate the 500 LB with electric start over the Twinspark T-bird as the motorcycle of choice from the Enfield stable. And that is only because Honda, Yamaha, Kawasaki and Suzuki and perhaps Bajaj has not understood the need for a large bore, single cylinder motorcycle to satiate my appetite. Change, as they say, is the only constant in this world and in the case of Royal Enfield, I am happy to attest,it is a continuous process than a sudden phenomenon. If you are looking for an ownership experience that would get you ready for even tougher institutions like marriage, then the Royal Enfield is for you. It continues to be a character building exercise than a mere motorcycle. And when the lust is lost and love translates to care…you will go a long way with a Royal Enfield.

To sum up, Enfiled continues to be in a league of its own and that means I have no option but to recommend it. Try the 500 LB too before you sign the dotted line, ok?
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2012
Messages
1,151
Likes
94
Location
Kannur, Kerala
Which Automotive Magazine?

Lets limit this thread to the various automotive magazines available around here. I know there are a lot of them right now. So, lets rate them & give a review about it so that we always end up buying the perfect one!
Currently, I am used to Top Gear India & I am feeling used to it. Might subscribe for a year or so! Its the writing style which makes me attracted to that. They actually made it in a rather funny manner & I'm lovin it! Even Overdrive is quite good for me. [:)]

Well, these are the magazines I have read so far - Bike India, Car India, Autocar, Overdrive & Top Gear.
Have seen more at the newstand like "What Car?" & magazines like that. But I didn't feel to buy one! :tongue:

Share yours.. [glasses]
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2011
Messages
2,536
Likes
1,304
Location
M.P.
Re: Which Automotive Magazine?

I think there's a similar thread on this issue. Maybe this thread could me merged with that one.
 

350Z

Core Team
Joined
Aug 10, 2009
Messages
18,763
Likes
6,738
Location
New Delhi
Re: Which Automotive Magazine?

Have seen more at the newstand like "What Car?" & magazines like that. But I didn't feel to buy one!
I bought a few initial issues of What Car? Primarily focused for new car buyers, it is more or less a compressed version of Autocar India.

Drive Safe,
350Z
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2011
Messages
2,536
Likes
1,304
Location
M.P.
Zigwheels is okay if you can digest the writing style of Adil Jal Darukhanawala. I personally can not- I detest his verbosity (though he is a man of excellent automotive knowledge). I subscribe to Top Gear and Business Standard Motoring. Top Gear has good articles,great photographs (their chief photographer Dhaval Dhairyawan passed away in April this year), and just about the best print quality. If that's what you are looking for then you won't be dissappointed. One grudge I have against Top Gear is that I have never received my copy of the magazine on schedule. Every month I have to keep waiting till the last week and then finally shoot them a mail whereupon they will send me a spare copy. So it invariably always happens that I receive the Top Gear copy of 'x' month in the first week of the next month (still awaiting my June '12 copy as I type this). I just hope mine is a one-off case.
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2012
Messages
1,151
Likes
94
Location
Kannur, Kerala
Zigwheels is okay if you can digest the writing style of Adil Jal Darukhanawala. I personally can not- I detest his verbosity (though he is a man of excellent automotive knowledge). I subscribe to Top Gear and Business Standard Motoring. Top Gear has good articles,great photographs (their chief photographer Dhaval Dhairyawan passed away in April this year), and just about the best print quality. If that's what you are looking for then you won't be dissappointed. One grudge I have against Top Gear is that I have never received my copy of the magazine on schedule. Every month I have to keep waiting till the last week and then finally shoot them a mail whereupon they will send me a spare copy. So it invariably always happens that I receive the Top Gear copy of 'x' month in the first week of the next month (still awaiting my June '12 copy as I type this). I just hope mine is a one-off case.
Oh. Right now, I prefer only Top Gear. Don't know why, just bought 2 issues till date but ended up subscribing now.
And that's really a saddening part that you aren't getting on time despite being near to mumbai. I hope this doesn't happen in my case. I finished reading my June issue some days before itself which I bought it from the news stand! I am waiting for the new July issue to release. As per the T&C's, the 1st issue takes 4-6 weeks to reach for the new subscribers [cry].
 
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
2,637
Likes
187
Location
Pune
Ok. So anyone has any opinion on ZigWheels?
Whatever it is, I subscribed to Top Gear for 1 year today online. [:)]
Zigwheels is Okie-dokie. Worth reading if you have not purchased it [;)].
Top Gear is good. You can also check out Auto India, it is good but is under-rated mag, maybe due to lower price.
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
626
Likes
155
Location
vellore
Sirish chandran of overdrive now with Autocar! Well looks like magazine space is hotting up! How and why he moved-who knows?,but it felt weird!
On a more sober note, magazines will loose out if more people are aware of the TAI! I feel though that the focus should be on honesty and value for money cars in India !Then any magazine/ web space will really make it big-some Car programmes on TV are beginning tyo sound more like adverts for the company![;)]
 

350Z

Core Team
Joined
Aug 10, 2009
Messages
18,763
Likes
6,738
Location
New Delhi
Sirish chandran of overdrive now with Autocar!
I don’t think so. He is introducing the The Evo Magazine to India last time when I read his tweet.

On a more sober note, magazines will loose out if more people are aware of the TAI!
Can’t agree more. So let’s spread the word across our tribe. [thumbswink]

Drive Safe,
350Z
 
Top Bottom