Carroll Shelby, Builder of Cobra Sports Car, Dies at 89


Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
2,975
Likes
26
Location
India
oh 2012 looks very unfortunate year for legends in auto industry..first Alexander Porsche died in april now shelby in may! may his soul rest in piece [sad]
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,937
Likes
211
Location
bangalore
Almost a month since Carroll Shelby’s death on May 10th, his ex-wife and children still fight over what to do with his remains.

Carroll died on May 10th, in Dallas, after a protracted illness. Carroll and Cleo, his wife, were no longer married, since 2010 when Carroll petitioned for divorce. Still Cleo claims that she still has the right to decide what happens with her ex-husband’s body.

On the other hand, Carroll’s children claim that the automotive icon left a document in which he gives his oldest son control over his remains. Cleo disputes this document is not valid since Carroll lacked the “physical capacity or eyesight” needed to sign off on the paperwork.
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,937
Likes
211
Location
bangalore
Legendary car designer Carroll Shelby, who was in the morgue since his death May 10 will be finally buried , thanks to a settlement between his three children and wife.

His three children say their father signed a document giving them permission to have his body cremated, though his last wife, Cleo, said the document was a forgery.

However, looks like Shelby will be cremated as he requested prior to his death.

Cleo Shelby will get 20 percent of his remains. Each of his three children will also get 20 percent and the last 20 percent will be buried in his parents’ family plot in Leesburg, Texas.

Shelby, who grew up in East Texas and attended Woodrow Wilson High School, won three U.S. sports-car championships in the 1950s and was the first American to drive for a European factory team in Formula One competition.

Shelby was the force behind the legendary Shelby Cobra sports car, as well as versions of Ford’s Mustang and Chrysler’s Viper.

When he died at age 89, Shelby also was one of the nation’s longest-living heart transplant recipients.
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,937
Likes
211
Location
bangalore
A Ford Shelby GT500KR once owned by Carroll Shelby is up for auction.

The Ford Shelby GT500KR made its public debut at the 2007 New York International Auto Show and came out on the market in spring 2008. They've made only 1,712 units of this car, with each of them featuring a supercharged V8 5.4-liter engine with 540 hp (402 kW / 547 PS), enough for a 0-62 mph sprint in 4.3 seconds. All of the cars feature a carbon fiber composite hood, a bespoke carbon fiber splitter, functional brake cooling ducts and carbon fiber mirror caps.
What makes this one truly special is the fact that it belonged to the late Carroll Shelby. The car has been driven for just 1,600 miles and it will be auctioned on October 12 and 13 by Vicari at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Mississippi. Above the glove box of the car is Shelby's signature, and the vehicle will be sold with a copy of the original title in Shelby's name, as well as a bill of sale from Shelby to the current owner of the GT500KR. The car has the chassis CSM #445 and it will be offered with a certificate of authenticity.

Visit the link for more details about this GT500KR that once belonged to Carroll Shelby himself.

2009 Shelby Mustang KR500 PERSONALLY OWNED BY CARROLL SHELBY Auto Auctions Vicari Auto Auctions
 

Attachments

Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,937
Likes
211
Location
bangalore
Shelby Cobra honored with historic display at Monterey Motorsports Reunion

Official press release:
Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion to Celebrate the Life of Carroll Shelby through the 50th Anniversary of Shelby Cobra

Shelby's Last Professional Race was in Monterey

MONTEREY, Calif., May 17, 2012 - A war veteran who flew B-29s, an oil roughneck, a chicken farmer...Carroll Shelby was a man of diverse talents. But he will forever be remembered as an automotive icon who transformed sports car racing and brought American pride to the international motorsports stage.

This year's Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, August 17-19, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Shelby Cobra. But the featured marque honor becomes more poignant with the recent passing of the man who was simply known to friends as "Shel."

The connection between Shelby and Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca has long been intertwined. Shelby was a frequent participant in the formative years of the raceway, then named Laguna Seca. It was here, on October 20, 1960, that Shelby drove the No. 98 Tipo 61 Maserati "Birdcage" in the final race of his legendary driving career. Despite taking nitroglycerin pills to ease chest pains, he finished second after leading much of the race. That position, however, earned enough points for Shelby to clinch the 1960 USAC Sports Car Championship.

While his professional driving days were over, Shelby was just getting started. He rarely looked in his rear view mirror, preferring to always look ahead at his next great adventure. "Yesterday is history. Tomorrow a mystery. Live today," he remarked in a 2009 interview.

Shelby adamantly said he was attending the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, an event that was always marked on his calendar, and was looking forward to reconnecting with former Shelby American engineers, drivers and employees.

Additional plans are underway to unite the Shelby legacy and spirit with the anniversary of one of the most iconic cars of all time, and certainly the most replicated. Among the highlights will be:


· Dedicated race of 45 authentic CSX 2000/3000 competition cars

· Shelby Cobra Heritage Display, presented by Ford Motor Company

· Cobra Car Show on Pit Lane (Saturday for all authentic street and race Cobras)

· Cobra Car Corral with hundreds of authentic, continuation and replica cars

· Carroll Shelby special tribute laps

· Picnic Q&A with a Shelby American team member

· 350 GT Mustangs racing and in a dedicated car corral

"Carroll Shelby and his Cobras have been integral to our facility's development. For a man who had his last professional race here and returned year after year for our historic car races, it is a privilege to host and present a public celebration of his life, his cars and his deep passion," said Gill Campbell, CEO/general manager of Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. "He will be missed roaming the paddock, but his spirit will forever live on."

Advance general admission tickets start at $50 with a three day pass for only $130 that includes a complimentary souvenir magazine. Children 12 and under are free with a paying adult. Hospitality options begin at $200 per person.
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,937
Likes
211
Location
bangalore
Nice Article for shelby lover's

How one man from Texas challenged and defeated automakers like Ferrari and Chevrolet. The worlds of motorsports and cars in general lost one of the greats recently. Carroll Shelby had a huge impact on racing, and his name has become a byword for performance car enthusiasts.Shelby had achieved fame in 1959 when he piloted an Aston-Martin DBR1 to a win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, but it was in 1961 when work would begin on the cars which would make him a legend. This first car was the larger-than-life Cobra, originally a small British roadster, which would be converted into a car which had Ferrari running scared.

The story of the Cobra really begins with the AC Ace, a small roadster which went into production in 1953. The car had used the Bristol 2.0-liter inline-six, a 100 horsepower engine dating back to just after the First World War.Naturally, this meant that the engine was positively ancient by the Sixties. Bristol therefore decided to discontinue it in 1961, and AC began work on a new car, an evolution of the Ace which used a 2.6-liter Ford Zephyr engine. Toward the end of the same year, Shelby wrote to AC about the possibility of using a Ford 260 HiPo V8 in their car, and asking if they would provide a prototype. It is believed by some that AC was without an engine for the car when Bristol discontinued their six-cylinder engine, and that it was the association with Shelby that saved the company, but the truth is that the plans for the 2.6 engine where already in place by the time Shelby wrote about using the bigger engine.The modification actually proved to be fairly simple. Most of the design changes required to fit a V8 under the hood had already been made for the sake of the 2.6 engine. Shelby had thought of the 260 as the perfect engine for his Cobra, since it was very compact for a V8 at the time, but it wasn't long before the engine was replaced.

The Mark I, as the first generation of the Cobra is known, was produced only from 1962 to 1963, and not even all of these have the 260 engine. Just 75 260 Cobras were built, with the remaining 51 Mark I Cobras getting the bigger 289 Windsor V8.Shelby worked with AC on some design changes so that the new 289 engine would be a better fit, and this saw the introduction of the Mark II Cobra in 1963. The Mark I and Mark II Cobras were extremely successful, at least at first. This was especially true in the US domestic race series, where the Cobra lost only one race in three years of competition.But by as early as 1964, there was a divergence in the evolution of the Cobra. In the US, the Cobra was doing well against its chief rival, the Corvette, but Shelby would still start to look at bigger and bigger engines to remain competitive.Europe was another story. The Cobra raced there against the Ferrari 250 GTO, a less powerful but more aerodynamic car. The Cobra was great on the typically shorter American tracks, where its power could be better used to its advantage, but on the long straightaways found on European tracks (most notably the famous Mulsanne straight at Le Mans) the Cobra's aerodynamic disadvantage allowed the Ferrari to pass it.

This led to the development of the Daytona, which we covered in a previous series and is essentially a hardtop version of the Mark II Cobra. This was successful at first, but Ford soon developed a better car for beating Ferrari, the GT40, and this took over racing duty as the priority shifted from GT class wins to overall victories.Shelby experimented briefly with a 390 engine in the Mark II Cobra, but ultimately concluded that a new generation of the Cobra with a 427 engine was the way to go. This was a car which was intended to compete with the Corvette in domestic sports car races, and that meant that Ford took a bigger interest in the car.They saw it as the best way for their name to be associated with something which could wallop a Corvette on the track. This car began production in January of '65, and the 485 hp it produced was not only an incredible number, but it was also enough to carry competition models up to 185mph. Probably the most famous two 427 Cobras were those modified by Shelby himself with the addition of a pair of Paxton superchargers.Shelby kept one of these for himself, and gave one to his friend, Bill Cosby. Cosby gives a hilarious account of just how terrifying it was to drive this beast in his album "200 M.P.H.", which also includes a very funny impression of Carroll Shelby.

Impressive as the Cobra was, it was a financial flop, and Ford and Shelby ended their involvement in 1967.AC continued to sell the car in various forms in Europe until 1973, but it wasn't exactly a big success for them either. What the Cobra really did was introduce Carroll Shelby's name to the world of car making, and his name is still attached to cars today.
Shelby's Legacy: The Cobra
 
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Messages
5,937
Likes
211
Location
bangalore
Nice Article for shelby lover's

How one man from Texas challenged and defeated automakers like Ferrari and Chevrolet. The worlds of motorsports and cars in general lost one of the greats recently. Carroll Shelby had a huge impact on racing, and his name has become a byword for performance car enthusiasts.Shelby had achieved fame in 1959 when he piloted an Aston-Martin DBR1 to a win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, but it was in 1961 when work would begin on the cars which would make him a legend. This first car was the larger-than-life Cobra, originally a small British roadster, which would be converted into a car which had Ferrari running scared.

The story of the Cobra really begins with the AC Ace, a small roadster which went into production in 1953. The car had used the Bristol 2.0-liter inline-six, a 100 horsepower engine dating back to just after the First World War.Naturally, this meant that the engine was positively ancient by the Sixties. Bristol therefore decided to discontinue it in 1961, and AC began work on a new car, an evolution of the Ace which used a 2.6-liter Ford Zephyr engine. Toward the end of the same year, Shelby wrote to AC about the possibility of using a Ford 260 HiPo V8 in their car, and asking if they would provide a prototype. It is believed by some that AC was without an engine for the car when Bristol discontinued their six-cylinder engine, and that it was the association with Shelby that saved the company, but the truth is that the plans for the 2.6 engine where already in place by the time Shelby wrote about using the bigger engine.The modification actually proved to be fairly simple. Most of the design changes required to fit a V8 under the hood had already been made for the sake of the 2.6 engine. Shelby had thought of the 260 as the perfect engine for his Cobra, since it was very compact for a V8 at the time, but it wasn't long before the engine was replaced.

The Mark I, as the first generation of the Cobra is known, was produced only from 1962 to 1963, and not even all of these have the 260 engine. Just 75 260 Cobras were built, with the remaining 51 Mark I Cobras getting the bigger 289 Windsor V8.Shelby worked with AC on some design changes so that the new 289 engine would be a better fit, and this saw the introduction of the Mark II Cobra in 1963. The Mark I and Mark II Cobras were extremely successful, at least at first. This was especially true in the US domestic race series, where the Cobra lost only one race in three years of competition.But by as early as 1964, there was a divergence in the evolution of the Cobra. In the US, the Cobra was doing well against its chief rival, the Corvette, but Shelby would still start to look at bigger and bigger engines to remain competitive.Europe was another story. The Cobra raced there against the Ferrari 250 GTO, a less powerful but more aerodynamic car. The Cobra was great on the typically shorter American tracks, where its power could be better used to its advantage, but on the long straightaways found on European tracks (most notably the famous Mulsanne straight at Le Mans) the Cobra's aerodynamic disadvantage allowed the Ferrari to pass it.

This led to the development of the Daytona, which we covered in a previous series and is essentially a hardtop version of the Mark II Cobra. This was successful at first, but Ford soon developed a better car for beating Ferrari, the GT40, and this took over racing duty as the priority shifted from GT class wins to overall victories.Shelby experimented briefly with a 390 engine in the Mark II Cobra, but ultimately concluded that a new generation of the Cobra with a 427 engine was the way to go. This was a car which was intended to compete with the Corvette in domestic sports car races, and that meant that Ford took a bigger interest in the car.They saw it as the best way for their name to be associated with something which could wallop a Corvette on the track. This car began production in January of '65, and the 485 hp it produced was not only an incredible number, but it was also enough to carry competition models up to 185mph. Probably the most famous two 427 Cobras were those modified by Shelby himself with the addition of a pair of Paxton superchargers.Shelby kept one of these for himself, and gave one to his friend, Bill Cosby. Cosby gives a hilarious account of just how terrifying it was to drive this beast in his album "200 M.P.H.", which also includes a very funny impression of Carroll Shelby.

Impressive as the Cobra was, it was a financial flop, and Ford and Shelby ended their involvement in 1967.AC continued to sell the car in various forms in Europe until 1973, but it wasn't exactly a big success for them either. What the Cobra really did was introduce Carroll Shelby's name to the world of car making, and his name is still attached to cars today.
Shelby's Legacy: The Cobra
 
Top Bottom